Henry Tenby Aviation Reporter – Henry Tenby – Classic Airline DVDs / Entrepreneur / and more https://www.henrytenby.com The latest aviation and internet business news from Henry Tenby Wed, 14 Sep 2022 02:59:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.10 Aircraft Display Models Stands – set of 10 for $125 + shipping https://www.henrytenby.com/aircraft-display-models-stands-set-of-10-for-125-shipping/ Tue, 05 Apr 2022 20:58:57 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=8897
Aircraft Display Models Stands – set of 10 for $125 + shipping
STOCK IS LIMITED

Set of 10 Aircraft Display Model Stands – $125 USD + shipping:

These limited production stands are custom produced by Henry Tenby and are available for a limited time while supplies last.

Each set of 10 stand includes 5 lighter gauge stands, and 5 heavier gauge stands.
The stands measure 7 inches (18cm) in height.
Rubber grommets are on the feet of all stands.

Prices below reflect actual AIR MAIL shipping cost from Vancouver, Canada with tracking and insurance.
Prices are in US dollars.

USA / CANADA buyers
$125 USD + $25 USD shipping (AIRMAIL , with tracking and insurance):
CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE

EUROPE / REST OF WORLD buyers
$125 USD + $59 USD shipping (AIRMAIL , with tracking and insurance):
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YVR Vancouver Airport Spotting Report and airport review 1960 https://www.henrytenby.com/yvr-vancouver-airport-spotting-report-and-airport-review-1960/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 07:11:59 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=8875 As an avid fan of Vancouver airport going to back to my firs visits of memory in the summer of 1967, as an adult and life long aviation fan, I have long held a fascination of the history of my hometown airport. I have endeavoured to collect original colour 35mm slides taken at YVR back in the 1950s and 1960s prior to the opening of the new terminal building in 1968. As such, I prepared this video report to share my wonderful old time memories and colour slide images of YVR from the good old days. If you have any old 35mm colour slides of YVR or aircraft from the 1950s and 1960s, I would be happy to hear from you by email to henrytenby at gmail dot com. I am pleased to present a special report of YVR in the 1950s and 1960s from local aviation historian Jerry Vernon, which is presented below the video.


The YVR terminal buildings as you say in the above video, the large TCA/Air Canada terminal building is still there as the South Terminal. My comments are more about the other building.

As I recall, that was sort of an “interim” terminal, and everybody was crammed into it before the larger glass-enclosed building was built. The original Vancouver air terminal was built in the mid-1930s. Tom McGrath’s book “History of Canadian Airports” has a photo of it in 1937, with Lockheed 12A CF-CCT at the completion of its Trans-Canada Flight in 1937.

That original terminal had a control tower built in the center of the building. The old terminal burned to the ground in 1949 and was replaced in 1950 by a “temporary” building, which I believe is the one that CP, PWA, etc. were still using in 1960. This building did have a tower included. Not sure when the separate structure was erected.

The “North Terminal” was extended in 1952 and on July 1, 1957, the “West Terminal” (now the South Terminal) was opened. The old North Terminal was expanded again in 1963, and eventually torn down when the existing main terminal was built in the middle of the airport in opening in 1968.

So, I would have flown in and out of that old terminal in 1957 when I flew in a PWA Canso (one of two they had) over to Tofino and back for some BCTel work.

I would have also flown out of it in 1956, when the RCAF allowed me to fly to and from Toronto for my RCAF Tech Officer Summer training at Camp Borden. Normally, we had to travel by train, but I had already travelled both ways by CNR in 1954 and both ways by CPR in 1955, so I managed to sweet-talk the Orderly Room into paying me my travel claim in cash and letting me make my own way.

The way it worked was that they assumed I was on the train, so paid me the train fare, the price of a lower berth, meals and tips for the porter (25¢ by day and 50¢ by night), taxi, etc. In theory, I was on the train for 4 days each way, so I was taken on strength and struck off strength accordingly. In fact, instead of spending most of the week on the train and arriving at Borden a day or so early, I flew the TCA North Star red-eye to Toronto on a Saturday night, took the local train up to Borden on Sunday and was ready to start my course on Monday. The cost worked out about the same…my travel claim worked out in the range of $100 – 120 and the North Star fare was about $100 – 110 each way, plus I shipped my duffel back home on the train when I flew in 1956.

In 1961, when I flew to and from Winnipeg in a TCA Vanguard, I would have flown out of the West Terminal.

Then, when I went to Hawaii by CPAir Britannia in 1962 and 1963, it would have been out of that “temporary” North Terminal that must have stood there for about 13 years.

As I recall, there was a period of years, after the air terminal operation had been moved to the present location, when the current South Terminal was converted into a Cargo Terminal, then back to what is it now for the smaller local airlines.

The convertible parked in front of the South Terminal is a 1960 Pontiac. I thought at first it was a 1960 Buick, but the back end isn’t quite right. I had a 1959 Buick 2-door hardtop, with the big wings, but they toned them down and rounded them off a bit in the 1960 model.

Kerrisdale Taxi, I don’t remember them, but in that time frame there were less than 400 Vancouver taxi licences, spread over a great many small operators. Between 1950 and 1980, the number of taxi licences remained frozen at 363!! I can see at least 4 Kerrisdale Taxi vehicles in the photos in your video above. They are 1958 Pontiacs, we had the same models as company cars at BCTel at that time. The flashy red car is a 1958 or 1959 Dodge.

The airport taxi concession was held for many years by MacClure’s Taxis, based in the Marpole area, who also owned Airline Limousines Ltd.(or was their name Airport Limousines??) MacClure’s have been around since 1911 and are still in business. It may be that Kerrisdale Taxi was owned by MacClure’s or were later absorbed into MacClure’s. What I found by looking them up was that MacClure’s / Airline Limousines had the exclusive airport pickup concession from 1968 to 1980, so perhaps before that it was a free-for-all for anybody to pick up at YVR?

A report I found stated: “By the boom years of the late 1920s, the city had dozens of rival taxi companies, names that have mostly disappeared from the public memory. There was ABC Taxi and BB Taxi; Fifty Cent Taxi and Fred’s Dollar Taxi; Frisco and Hollywood; Owl and Sun; Canadian and Dominion; Commercial and Webster’s Peerless; Devonshire and Kerrisdale; Mikado and Nabata; Queens and Empress and Royal City; Ready and Roamer; De Luxe and Gold Band.”

The 1950s and 1960s were time of consolidation in the Vancouver taxi business, and most of the small operators became part of the bigger fleets of MacClure’s, Yellow, Black Top/Checker and Advance Taxis. The owner-operators became shareholders/co-owners in the larger taxi companies and that is the way it still is, as far as I know.

Getting back to the photos in your video, as far as I can recall, the doors did indeed empty out onto the tarmac and passengers went out and up the portable airstairs into the aircraft as you stated.

When you show the Super Connie photo with the Okanagan hangar in the background, you say this is facing South. This is actually facing West and that old Okanagan hangar was there for a long time, I think it is still there along Agar Drive, on the way into the FBOs on the West side. Have a look at the later photo of the TCA DC-8, with the same hangar in the background.

The old TCA schedule in your video: note at the end of the list of Vancouver flights there is a North Star red-eye service in each direction. That is the reverse of the flight I look in 1956 to Toronto. Left YVR late at night, one stopover in Winnipeg and into Toronto early the next morning. The exhaust flame of the Merlin engines was very spectacular at night!

Fares as I noted above, the one-way North Star fare between Toronto and Vancouver was, as I remember, $110 in 1956. Almost exactly the same as the RCAF paid me to, in theory, take the train for four days including fare, birth, meals, tips, etc.

Have another look at that photo of the United Airlines 720. Are you sure it is 1960, the same as the others? See the hangar in the background, just ahead of the tail of the 720. That is not the RCAF wartime hangar, it is the first hangar that Air Canada built over on the North side, and I don’t think it is anywhere to be seen in the earlier 1960 photos that show the other side. I think you slipped a non-1960 shot in there! (Note: I checked the actual slide and it was actually taken in July of 1961, so Jerry is correct in pointing out it could not have been taken in 1960.)

And then Ron Moor sent me the following comments:

Hi Henry I really enjoyed your video presentation of the old airport. I started working there with United Airlines in 1962. Just a couple of points. United had its own check in counter and offices in the West terminal along with Trans Canada Airlines.US Customs had a small office behind the counter. Checked in passengers exited out and down a covered walkway to an enclosed building where US immigration were located and the waiting room called Gate 6. All the time I was there they never used the Canadian Pacific airlines North terminal. I thought you would enjoy this.

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VARIG L-188 Electra Ponte Aerea COLOUR Photo book – by Henry Tenby (ORDER NOW!) https://www.henrytenby.com/varig-l-188-electra-ponte-aerea-colour-photo-book-by-henry-tenby-order-now/ https://www.henrytenby.com/varig-l-188-electra-ponte-aerea-colour-photo-book-by-henry-tenby-order-now/#respond Sun, 19 Dec 2021 02:38:17 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=8527
GET IT FOR FREE — OR PURCHASE YOUR COPY BELOW
VARIG Lockheed L-188 Electra photo book – by Henry Tenby

VARIG L-188 Electra book by Henry Tenby

VARIG Ponte Aerea L-188 Electra LIMITED EDITION Photo Book

VARIG Lockheed L-188 Electra Photo Book – 58 pages all colour / First Edition by Henry Tenby:

Created and printed in Canada, welcome to this special edition photo book by aviation journalist Henry Tenby to mark the 30th anniversary of the retirement of the VARIG Lockheed L-188 Electra fleet.

During the 1980s, Henry Tenby made several visits to the VARIG Lockheed Electra operation as a guest of VARIG Airlines so that he could report on this fascinating propliner operation for the then new Airliners Magazine, which was being published by the late John Wegg.

This collectible photo book features the very best images of the VARIG Lockheed Electras taken by Henry Tenby during his visits to the Ponte Aerea air-bridge Electra operation, that connected Rio’s Santos Dumont Airport to Congonhas airport in Sao Paulo.

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Frankfurt Aviation Collectibles Show NOV 6 2021 – Show Report by Henry Tenby https://www.henrytenby.com/frankfurt-aviation-collectibles-show-nov-6-2021-show-report-by-henry-tenby/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 02:03:11 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=8517

On November 6, 2021 – Frankfurt: I was able to attend my first aviation collectibles show since the start of the global pandemic. It took place in Frankfurt, Germany at the Hofheim Stadthale (Community Centre) located just a few steps from the Hofheim Station. In years past the Frankfurt Aviation Collectibles shows were being held for some decades at the sports hall in Schwanheim. The new location in Hofheim is a huge improvement over the old Schwanheim hall for many reasons.

The new Hofheim hall is large, bright and new with a very high ceiling. This means it is very comfortable for the show attendees as there is lots of space in the aisles, and it is not hot and stuffy and not over crowded. It was very pleasant to be inside the hall. And my hope is they will continue to use this hall for all future shows in Frankfurt for coming years.

As a collector of professional aircraft display models the Frankfurt show really fantastic. I was able to purchase some really nice models for my collection as I always do. The stars of the show for display models with the amazing Dutch model collecting brothers Patrick and Ed Van Rooijen. Between the two of them they had probably 100 or more fantastic models for sale to serious collectors, many of which are shown in my video. But there was also a huge selection of safety cards, books, diecast models, stickers, barf bags, uniforms, wings, pins and all sorts of aviation and airline collectibles to satisfy all collector’s needs one can imagine.

For more information about future Frankfurt aviation collectibles fairs visit their website:
https://www.fra-aviationfair.com/https://www.fra-aviationfair.com/

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The Air Canada Vanguard Passes Into History https://www.henrytenby.com/the-air-canada-vanguard-passes-into-history/ https://www.henrytenby.com/the-air-canada-vanguard-passes-into-history/#respond Sat, 20 Nov 2021 00:52:59 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=8515 FLASHBACK 1971: AIR CANADA CAPTAIN J. R. DESMARIAS, WHO HAS 1,000 HOURS ON VANGUARDS, MOURNS THE PASSING OF THIS BEAUTIFUL BIRD

Air Canada Vanguard last flight October 31 1971

CLICK HERE to read about the Air Canada Viscount Last Flight

It was 0134 hours, Sunday, October 31, 1971. At Montreal International Airport, the brightly lit ramp was quiet. Because of the 11 pm curfew, the jets had stopped operating. The flashing beacons of the ramp trucks had disappeared one by one. Beyond the terminal building, the blue taxiway lights added to the stillness.

From their vantage point in the tower, the controllers could see a red rotating light moving slowly across the horizon, joining a long final for runway 06R.

“Montreal Tower, Air Canada 2458, we’re cleared for a visual approach.” That was Capt. S. F. Davis handling the radio; F/O Lorne Dyck was flying the airplane.

In the back were 16 passengers, including Kent Davis, Air Canada’s Vice-President of flight operations, and Capt. Bill Benson, Director of Flight Standards.

“Air Canada 2458, Montreal Tower. You’re cleared to land. Wind 060 at 12, altimeter 30.31.”

“Air Canada 2458.”

CF-TKB (725) Nice taxying shot at the Farnborough Air Show back in 1960.

CF-TKB (725) Nice taxying shot at the Farnborough Air Show back in 1960.

The flashing red light continued toward the runway as F/O Dyck descended tenderly. Suddenly the threshold was illuminated by three bright landing lights, and F/O Dyck set the airplane down without a ripple at 0139. As the airplane approached the terminal area, it first became a silhouette and then the unmistakable box-like shape of a Vickers Vanguard. The big prop-jet taxied to gate 43 and shut down. Thus, routinely and unceremoniously, 2458 marked the end of passenger service on the Vanguard, that rugged, magnificent aircraft that had served Trans-Canada Air Lines and then Air Canada for more than 10 years.

One who may have felt the end more than most was Capt. Benson. It was exactly 11 years ago on that night that he flew to England to begin his training on the Vanguard.

Selection of the Vanguard by TCA came after one of the most exhaustive studies of aircraft operating economics ever completed in the industry. The Vickers Vanguard was matched against all other potential medium—range airplanes, flying and projected, pure jet and turbo-propeller, before it was selected. Over TCA’s routes, which not only had to be averaged but factored to account for traffic density, the Vanguard came first. But many other factors, some not easily calculated came into the picture.

Some people in TCA were all for going pure jet; when the DC-9 came second in the economics study, this was all they wanted to know. But the ‘9’ was then a ‘paper’ airplane, Douglas Aircraft awaiting solid commitments before proceeding. Should the airplane be built, it would be out two years later than the Vanguard, putting TCA at a competitive disadvantage for that period.

CF-TKB (293) fresh from the factory at Weybridge prior to delivery to Canada. In this instance the people do not detract from the photo.

CF-TKB (293) fresh from the factory at Weybridge prior to delivery to Canada. In this instance the people do not detract from the photo.

(The project DC-9 was a different airplane from what was eventually produced. Range was to be 2.600 miles, definitely ‘medium’. The Boeing 727 filled that area and the ‘9’ as we know it was introduced in airline service as a ‘medium-short’ airplane in 1965.)

Also, the Vanguard had a cargo hold volume that no other passenger airplane could offer and freight projections indicated a needed capacity in that area as well. Still, the jet people had good arguments: definitely superior passenger appeal, longer projected life and, in the case of the DC-9, certain parts interchangeability with the DC-8, offering additional economics.

The Vanguard won out, however. On January 3, 1957, TCA announced the purchase of 20 Vanguards for a sum of $67.1 million. Eventually, three more were obtained, making TCA the world’s largest Vanguard Operator.

The first flight of the Vanguard took place on January 20, 1959 and the first TCA airplane began flying on July 9, 1960. In the July 22 issue, Aero Magazine reported the start of trials of the TCA Vanguard and, buried obscurer in the article, a small note to the effect that one of the differences between the TCA and British European Airways Vanguards was the fact that TCA had specified Skydrol 500A hydraulic fluid. Oh. How large that difference was going to be.

An unidentified Trans-Canada Air Lines Vanguard gets airborne from Vickers Weybridge, Surrey during an early test flight.

An unidentified Trans-Canada Air Lines Vanguard gets airborne from Vickers Weybridge, Surrey during an early test flight.

On Halloween 1960, five TCA pilots proceeded to Weybridge, England for the Vanguard course. They were Capt. George Lothian, then Superintendent of Flying, Capt. Ron Baker, TCA’s engineering test pilot, and Captains Bill Benson, Ed Marriott and Al Wilton, who were to be the initial instructors on the Vanguard and later check pilots.

After ground school. Captain Baker pursued a course befitting his capacity while the other four captains were paired in two groups for the flight training. The Vickers instructors were Dick Rymer, who was later killed in the BAC-III deep—stall accident, and Denis Hailey-Bell.

Vanguard had already developed teething problems, one of them being the failure of cabin compressors. While Vickers and Rolls—Royce were working on modifications, training carried on without pressurization or cabin temperature control, in the dead of winter.

Another problem evident at that stage was the presence of nose-wheel shimmies. Although they were found not to affect the integrity of the structure, the severity of the shimmies was as pronounced as it was unpredictable. Ron Baker got into the act; he went up with Dick Rymer and Bill Benson and they tried every possible way of landing to bring on the shimmy, unsuccessfully. After eighteen attempts, they decided to quit. Benson said: “Let’s try it once more.” On the nineteenth try, the airplane behaved as if it had landed on top of railroad ties.

Trans-Canada Air Lines Vickers Vanguard CF-TKB being put through the paces at the Farnborough airshow, 1960 or 1961.

Trans-Canada Air Lines Vickers Vanguard CF-TKB being put through the paces at the Farnborough airshow, 1960 or 1961.

This problem, like many others typical of development flying, sent the engineers back to the drawing board and improvements were eventually made.

George Lothian and Al Wilton flew the first aircraft to Canada and the flight training program for the line pilots started. The Vanguard simulator was already installed and proved to be an excellent one. In addition to duplicating all systems, the Vanguard ‘box’ incorporated sound simulation. Engine noise, rush of air as in a rapid decompression, whine of an over-speeding propeller, even the tire squeal on landing. Once, during a simulator exercise, the instructor failed all four engines to see what the pilots would do.

They were “flying” at six thousand feet and their initial reaction was one of staring disbelief. The two pilots looked at each other for confirmation of reality then, questioningly, at the instructor sitting behind them. They were losing altitude, and fast: “Is this a power failure, like I mean, Quebec Hydro?” asked the pilot in the left seat. “No, it’s a power failure, like I mean, your engines!” answered the instructor. The pilots swiftly initiated the air-start procedure. With one going and one windmilling, the ‘aircraft’ was going in at a 30° angle. In desperation, the pilot in the right seat selected gear down. When they ‘hit’, the simulator fastidiously gave them the ‘screech-screech’ of the wheels.

The inaugural flight took place February 1, 1961, and was flown by Capt. Benson and Captains Dave Moir of Vancouver and Jack Smith of Toronto. The route was Montreal – Toronto – Winnipeg – Regina – Calgary – Vancouver. During the station stop in Winnipeg, it was discovered that the fire warning bell test circuit was un-serviceable. To ensure that the bell would work in case of an actual fire, the fire wire in each engine was grounded in turn by maintenance, the bell ringing in the cockpit each time. At the next stop, Regina, the procedure was repeated. Again in Calgary. But this time five bells were heard. Jack Smith, who carried an alarm clock in his bag, had set the thing to go off!

Trans-Canada Airlines Vanguard CF-TKN in a truly mouthwatering shot for the unabashed Vickers Vanguard fanatic. Obviously this 35mm kodachrome colour slide was taken on board a sister ship, with engines running. We can soak up the atmosphere of the then brand new Toronto Malton Terminal 1 with Trans-Canada Vanguard CF-TKN at the gate awaiting her passengers. Oh my lord ... What a superb shot.

Trans-Canada Airlines Vanguard CF-TKN in a truly mouthwatering shot for the unabashed Vickers Vanguard fanatic. Obviously this 35mm kodachrome colour slide was taken on board a sister ship, with engines running. We can soak up the atmosphere of the then brand new Toronto Malton Terminal 1 with Trans-Canada Vanguard CF-TKN at the gate awaiting her passengers. Oh my lord … What a superb shot!

The early days of the Vanguard were beset by problems. One was vibration, with a resulting high noise level. By coincidence, it turned out that the fuselage length and the position and RPM of the props set up a natural vibration, which would slowly be transmitted through the fuselage all the way to the tail . . . and forth . . . and back . . . The Vanguard was a perfect tuning fork!

In concert with BEA and TCA, Vickers tackled the problem and a temporary procedure involved climbing with 5° flap. Later. Mainly through the addition of weights to the tailplane, the problem was solved, but not to everyone’s satisfaction. Already spoiled by jets, people expected the same of the Vanguard, something a turbo-prop is simply unable to deliver.

Canada Airline Industry 1960s Coast to Coast movie on JetFlix TVChoosing the new Skydrol 500A for hydraulic fluid was wise; it was super stuff. The fact that the seals were eaten away by it was another matter. Hydraulic problems were chronic. As one passenger stated, “When they can’t get the heels down, I get nervous; in that airplane, they couldn’t get them UP!” Well, sometimes. Actually, it took a sizeable loss of fluid before services would no longer operate. Other aircraft would be taxiing behind a Vanguard and advise that it was dripping hydraulic fluid; “We know, we know,” would be the reply.

That problem was solved by the replacement of seals and other difficulties were being surmounted as well. Schedule reliability increased gradually so that by November, 1961, on-time performance had reached 71 per cent compared to 41 per cent two months previously.

That winter, the Vanguard was introduced to the South. Still unsatisfied with the aircraft’s reliability, TCA wanted a back—up for what was to be the Vanguard’s premier run. It was decided to stand a Lockheed Super Constellation next to the Vanguard on the ramp so that if the latter packed up at the last minute, the passengers would be transferred to the waiting Constellation. Since Toronto did not have ‘Connie’ crews, a Montreal crew would stay at a motel close to the airport, ready to lend support. If the Vanguard worked, they would return to the motel. After a few days they would go back to Montreal and be relieved by another crew. Sometimes they got to fly, most often not. That operation came to be known as the ‘Conguard’!

Dave Tennant is now Air Canada’s Vice-president — Personnel but was formerly Vice-president — Operations and had a hand in choosing the Vanguard for TCA. He said: “The Vanguard was the best for the mission; when we looked at the cost projections, it was a winner. The belly compartment with its great cargo capacity just added to that.”

The Vanguard was a newer airplane than the first generation of jets but the prestige was stolen by the Douglas DC-8 which TCA had introduced in Canada ten months earlier. Not only was the jet smoother and quieter but the ‘8’ was glamorous.

When Trans-Canada Air Lines was renamed Air Canada in 1965, all the types were taken up for a new round of air-to-air publicity shots, which was the occasion for this lovely image, originally from Air Canada archives. This photo of CF-TKP is actually a photo teaser from my book

When Trans-Canada Air Lines was renamed Air Canada in 1965, all the types were taken up for a new round of air-to-air publicity shots, which was the occasion for this lovely image, originally from Air Canada archives. This photo of CF-TKP is actually a photo teaser from my book “Air-To-Air: Ultimate Airline Photography” which showcases 175 all-colour pages of classic propliners and classic jetliners photographed inflight. You can purchase your own copy of my book right here: https://www.henrytenby.com/product/air-to-air-ultimate-airline-photography-by-henry-tenby/.

People were spoiled: they did not realize that the jet was still basically a long-range airplane. At the time that the Vanguard was introduced, two medium-range pure jets were flying, the Convair 880 and the British-built De Havilland Comet 4.

Neither presented anywhere near the passenger seat cost economics of the Vanguard over the routes flown by TCA and their purchase would have resulted in higher fares with little decrease in block times. Both being very thirsty aircraft. It was somehow forgotten that most of the world’s medium-range routes were still being flown by pistons.

Above the Clouds TCA Air Canada Air-to-Air Symphony 1940s-1970s – Now on JetFlix TVIn the Vanguard, the value dollar for dollar, was unsurpassed. The Vanguard offered the best travel bargain. The Economy cabin had larger seats and was superior to that of any short/medium-haul aircraft then flying. The first-class section was magnificent. Isolated at the rear, the quiet little club remains in the eyes of many a unique travel experience. And Vanguard’s over-sized oval windows (like the smaller Viscount) provided passengers with unparalleled views.

The safety record of the Vanguard is exceptional.

The aircraft was introduced in service with perhaps a larger than usual share of teething problems yet it progressed through the ‘learning curve’ without a major accident. The later fatal crash of a BEA Vanguard at Heathrow, England was attributed to pilot error and in Air Canada service a lone fatality resulted from a passenger being killed when a flight unexpectedly encountered severe clear air turbulence over Rocky Mountain House. Alta. In a landing accident at Antigua and in a wheels-up landing at Montreal, no one was injured. It can be said that the Vanguard, of itself, has never as much as scratched anyone. (At the time of writing, the tragic BEA Vanguard accident in Belgium was still under investigation.)

Yet another nice profile view of Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKP during her air-to-air company name rebrand publicity shots back in 1965, from Air Canada archives.

Yet another nice profile view of Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKP during her air-to-air company name rebrand publicity shots back in 1965, from Air Canada archives.

Of the wheels-up landing in Montreal following a hydraulic failure, certain anecdotes are worthy of mention: Captain Ed Marriott, in command of the flight, was in communication with TCA via the company frequency. Since this was the first year of Vanguard operation, everyone was not only concerned but also a bit in the dark as to why the landing gear would not, at least, free-fall. Through a communications set-up, Capt. Marriott was put in direct contact with a Vickers engineer at home in bed in Weybridge, England!

Aware that they would circle for quite a while, Capt. Marriott authorized the serving of drinks to the passengers. The stewardess advised that she had sealed the bar when ‘in range’ of Montreal, as per company regulations. “Well, open it again,” directed Capt. Marriott. This she did, by bashing it open with the fire axe! Air Canada has always been a market leader in terms of the highest levels of passenger service.

The hydraulic off-load switch was once a problem. When the switch was in the ‘off’ position, the system was ‘on-loaded’ (pressurized), and vice-versa. Well, think about it: if the off-load switch is off, then you’re on-loaded, right? Of course, perfectly logical. But try to teach it in the class- room. TCA finally changed it to be more in tune with the Canadian mind and linguistics; when the switch said ‘on’, you were ‘ON’. Don’t think, baby, just fly the plane!

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKG looks amazing sitting on the Montreal Dorval apron back in 1967.This Vanguard was sold to Air Holdings Limited as G-AYLD in 1969, as part of a trade-in deal with Lockheed towards new L-1011s. Lockheed re-sold the Air Canada Vanguards to Air Holdings for onward disposal. I don't like the word

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKG looks amazing sitting on the Montreal Dorval apron back in 1967.This Vanguard was sold to Air Holdings Limited as G-AYLD in 1969, as part of a trade-in deal with Lockheed towards new L-1011s. Lockheed re-sold the Air Canada Vanguards to Air Holdings for onward disposal. I don’t like the word “disposal” when applied to Vickers Vanguards.

Another dandy was the ‘Chime Isolate’. The Vanguard galley control panel incorporated a number of switches for diverse services and these were indicated above each switch. One such switch was marked ‘Chime’; just under the word ‘chime’ was ‘Isolate’ for turning it off and below the switch was printed ‘on’ for, naturally, having the thing on. A lot of stewardesses read that as the ‘Chime Isolate’ so that if it was selected ‘on’ the chime would be isolated. They therefore moved the switch to the other position, in effect turning it off

Air Canada Vanguard and DC-8 streaming on JetFlix TVIn the cockpit, pilots would hit the call button with ever-increasing frenzy, wishing for a cup of coffee. At the end of the flight, the pilots would say to the ‘stew’: “We called you a hundred times, where were you?” And the ‘stew’ would answer: “I never heard the chime; I guess it doesn’t work.” The pilots would then write in the maintenance log book that the chime was unserviceable. Maintenance would try it, find it in perfect working order and enter in the book: ‘Ground-checked Serviceable’. They would then leave the switch in the ‘on’ position.

The next crew of stewardesses would board the aircraft, change the switch over and the whole cycle would start all over again. It took years for us stupid Canadians to figure that one out.

Yet another example of the difference between British and Candian logic and linguistics.

It is impossible to describe the propeller system. Suffice it to say that it has nine protective devices to prevent the props from going into ‘ground-fine’ in the air. Glen Cawker of Air Canada says that when the Englishman who designed the propeller was finished with it, they took him away.

What was it like to fly the Vanguard? Well, it was much more than flying a big Viscount. Bill Benson, who is now Air Canada’s Director of Flight Standards, said: “I loved the airplane; it was a great rudder airplane, it made you fly more, The Vanguard had the finest cockpit ever designed; the lighting was superb. It was simply magnificent over the lights of Montreal.”

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKH awaits passengers on the Dorval apron as viewed from the once sprawling open air observation deck at Montreal. In this case the photo was taken in 1967, and the Vanguard is carrying the small Expo 67 logo by the right sill of the rear passenger door. CF-TKH was sold to Europe Air Service in 1972 as F-BTOU.

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKH awaits passengers on the Dorval apron as viewed from the once sprawling open air observation deck at Montreal. In this case the photo was taken in 1967, and the Vanguard is carrying the small Expo 67 logo by the right sill of the rear passenger door. CF-TKH was sold to Europe Air Service in 1972 as F-BTOU.

Brian Trubshaw, who was later to test-fly the Concorde, was Chief Test Pilot on the Vanguard project. He demanded more space in the cockpit, knowing from experience that the dimensions would be cut back later. This time the boffins listened to him. The result. The Vanguard had, and still has, the most spacious flight station of any commercial airplane. As one stewardess expressed when she first set foot inside the Vanguard cockpit: “You could have a dance in here!”

“But the airplane was a great leveller,” adds Benson. “Most guys came on it from the Viscount and were used to greasing it on.” Said Capt. Gerry Lloyd, Air Canada’s Flight Operations Director, Toronto Base: “The Vanguard was a horse of a different wheelbarrow.”

And how! At the beginning, the landings were atrocious. Pilots would cross the fence, close the throttles and. . . crunch! Well, isn’t that the way we were all taught? The Vanguard, with four wide, 141/2 foot diameter props was different, all right. First, when the throttles were closed, the props went against the ‘flight fine’ stops, a relatively flat pitch; second, and partially as a result of the first, the immediate speed reduction caused the airplane to sink rapidly and contact the runway. ‘Contact’ is the key word here.

The plane had wings and it had engines; there just had to be some way of putting the two together and decently depositing the Vanguard on the runway. “No. There is no way,” said one. Said another: “Where you close the throttles, that’s where you land.”

Said yet another, despairingly: “Any landing you walk away from is a good one.” But a few were having some success and the word gradually filtered to the troops. The guys were no longer crashing them on, but the airplane remained a challenge right to the end.

Stopping distance was phenomenal. With over twice the weight of the Viscount and additional speed over the threshold, the Vanguard could be stopped shorter, even without reversing. Putting the propellers into the ‘ground’ mode after touchdown sent them to aerodynamic 0°, effectively offering the slipstream a veritable barn door. On scheduled airport runways, reverse was never used, brakes hardly. Yet, if you needed them, they were there. Tremendous security.

Passengers boarding Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKU at Montreal Dorval, June 1965. This Vanguard was sold by Air Canada to Air Holdings Limited in 1969 as G-AZNG in trade for Lockheed L-1011s.

Passengers boarding Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKU at Montreal Dorval, June 1965. This Vanguard was sold by Air Canada to Air Holdings Limited in 1969 as G-AZNG in trade for Lockheed L-1011s.

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKH awaits passengers on the Dorval apron as viewed from the once sprawling open air observation deck at Montreal. In this case the photo was taken in 1967, and the Vanguard is carrying the small Expo 67 logo by the right sill of the rear passenger door. CF-TKH was sold to Europe Air Service in 1972 as F-BTOU

Three pilots hold the distinction of having flown every Vanguard that was ever built. They are Capt. Hans Schlieper, First Officer Ike Jones and former First Officer Doug Vann. All three were TCA pilots who flew with BEA after being laid off by the former. They later returned to their homeland and flew the Air Canada Vanguards. Capt. Schlieper, with more than a little naval tradition, expressed his feelings: “She was the last of the four-masted square riggers. I detest the thought of being a wooden man in an iron ship, with no bridge to pace.”

Capt. Lloyd Warriner, who alternately flew the line, instructed and was a check pilot on the Vanguard referred to it, and still does, as the ‘World’s Greatest Airplane’.

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard 952C CF-TKK was the only Vanguard in the fleet converted to pure freighter, as explained in the article above. And seen in this photo at Toronto Malton in August, 1970. In 1972 this Air Canada Vanguard was sold to Europe Aero Service as F-BTYB where it continued to operate through the decade of the 1970s as a Perpignon-based cargo hauler.

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard 952C CF-TKK was the only Vanguard in the fleet converted to pure freighter, as explained in the article above. And seen in this photo at Toronto Malton in August, 1970. In 1972 this Air Canada Vanguard was sold to Europe Aero Service as F-BTYB where it continued to operate through the decade of the 1970s as a Perpignon-based cargo hauler.

Perhaps no other transport aircraft imparted such an exhilarating feeling to its pilots and it appears that with automation, none ever will. Pilots loved the Vanguard with an emotion like that held for the DC-3.

If you should hear that unmistakable sound, if you should see that unique shape, you’re not dreaming; there is still one Vanguard in Canadian skies. CF-TKK. It is a freighter, Air Canada’s lone experiment at modifying the Vanguard for cargo operation. No additional aircraft will be converted as it cannot be justified economically. However, this freighter will continue in service for an indefinite period.

When they pass TKK in their faster jets, former Vanguard pilots will not look down on it. They will let their eyes languish a few seconds before returning their attention to the horizon, thinking . . . there she goes, the last of the great prop-liners.

We've saved the best Air Canada Vickers Vanguard photos for the last. In this case we are presented with the signature low deck angle departure shot of an Air Canada Vickers Vanguard from Montreal Dorval taken in March, 1965. This original slide came fro the famous Thompson slide collection.

We’ve saved the best Air Canada Vickers Vanguard photos for the last. In this case we are presented with the signature low deck angle departure shot of an Air Canada Vickers Vanguard from Montreal Dorval taken in March, 1965. This original slide came fro the famous Thompson slide collection.

The signature front office nose on shot with the lovely view of the engines and beefy props and trademark black nose Air Canada Vickers Vanguard at Toronto Malton, October 1969. The font view of a Vanguard is pure magic.

The signature front office nose on shot with the lovely view of the engines and beefy props and trademark black nose Air Canada Vickers Vanguard at Toronto Malton, October 1969. The font view of a Vanguard is pure magic!

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Aeroflot TU-104 visit to Vancouver Airshow Sunday June 15, 1958 https://www.henrytenby.com/aeroflot-tu-104-visit-to-vancouver-airshow-sunday-june-15-1958-2/ https://www.henrytenby.com/aeroflot-tu-104-visit-to-vancouver-airshow-sunday-june-15-1958-2/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 21:56:54 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=8496

On Sunday June 15, 1958, Aeroflot TU-104 jetliner CCCP-175445 at the Vancouver airport airshow on Sunday, June 25, 1958. It was here that Boeing’s 707 Test Pilot Tex Johnson told the TU-104 what he thought about the aircraft after having had a flight on it that day: “I have a message for the captain. Please tell him that in my twenty-one thousand hours of piloting time, the TU-104 is the sorriest damn airplane I have ever had the misfortune of flying in.”

An airshow was held on Sunday June 15, 1958 at Vancouver’s Sea Island Airport as part of the Province’s 100th anniversary celebrations. The race for leadership in the passenger jetliner market was heating up in the late 1950s with numerous aircraft builders bringing brand new jet powered airliners to the forefront.



The cold war realities brought the Americans and the Russians face-to-face at the Vancouver Airshow with Boeing bringing their new Boeing 707, and the Russians bringing their new Tupolev TU-104 jetliner. Both jetliners performed demonstration flights that day, and the story of the friction between the two competing aircraft builders was relayed to the public in newspaper stories of the day.

What follows is an account as described by the Price George Citizen paper that was headlined “Incident at Vancouver Airshow: Russian Pilot Gives – And Gets – Emphatic ‘Niet’”

The East-West curtain was parted for a day in Vancouver on Sunday, June 15, 1958, and what might have been become an international aeronautical incident, was actually averted.

The giant Russian airliner, the all-jet Tupolev TU-104, was on public view at Vancouver’s International Airport at an airshow. Air Force officials estimated 100,000 people attended the airshow, part of a two-day British Columbia centennial event.

But Russian-United States relations became a little strained at one point during the day. Captain T. T. Frolov, the Russian plane’s pilot, had been granted permission to make a courtesy flight and visit to Victoria airport from Vancouver – a mere 75 miles as the jet flies. But the trip had to be cancelled.

The flight path of the aircraft would have brought it close to the international border where San Juan Island (American Territory) juts into Canadian territorial waters in the Georgia Strait.



Captain Frolov, fearing slight drift might accidentally cause him to cross the US boundary, asked that assurances would be given so that his aircraft would not be challenged by U.S. jet interceptors. Canadian Air Force officials were told by the Americans that no such assurances would be forthcoming from the U.S. Air Force authorities.

The Russian pilot was told “Nobody will say, they the Americans won’t scramble, even if just to take a look at you.” Therefore, diplomatically, the TU-104 flight to Victoria was cancelled, and instead a courtesy flight over greater Vancouver was planned, with government officials, aviation representatives from both Canada and the USA, and newspapermen being invited aboard.

Earlier in the day, Captain Frolov and his officers were taken on a demonstration flight aboard the Boeing 707 jet Stratoliner, as guests of A. M. Tex Johnston, Chief of Flight Testing for the Boeing Aircraft Company. Once the 707 was aloft, Tex Johnston invited Captain Frolov to sit in the pilot’s seat and handle the 707’s flight controls for most of the hour-long flight.

Captain Frolov said the Boeing 707 had “beautiful flight control” and seemed impressed with Boeing’s new jetliner. Later the same day, a reciprocal invitation was extended by the Russians to the Boeing 707 crew to join the Tupolev TU-104 demonstration flight. Johnston asked if the favour could be returned so he could handle the controls of the Tupolev TU-104. Frolov said “niet”.

Johnston then asked if he could sit in the Co-Pilot’s seat and Captain Frolov again refused the request, explaining that it took two trained men to fly the Russian plane. At this point, Johnston retired from the discussion, but later said the TU-104 appeared heavy to handle and slow to respond. Tex Johnston was quoted in the media as saying “For my money their plane is obsolete”.

At the airshow’s ground display, a number of people collapsed in the 100-degree outdoor temperature near the Russian plane, which was a major attraction of the airshow. On one occasion, the barriers around the TU-104 were carried away by the crowd when told to stand back to avoid being scorched by the jet exhausts.

In his book Jet Age Test Pilot, Tex Johnston provided a detailed account of the events that took place at the 1958 Vancouver airshow. Specifically, he recalled that when they were back on the ramp upon arrival from the TU-104 demonstration flight, with the deplaning stairway in place, and the engines winding down, Tex Johnston turned to the navigator and said, “I have a message for the Captain. Please tell him that in my twenty-one thousand hours of piloting time, the TU-104 is the sorriest damn airplane I have ever had the misfortune of flying in.” The navigator sat and looked at me. “Go ahead. Tell him exactly what I said.”

As airline history would transpire in the decades after this event, the Boeing 707 family of jetliners became the staple of international jet travel, and were only replaced when more fuel efficient wide-body jetliners were delivered to the world’s airlines in the 1970s. Conversely, the Tupolev 104 was a commercial failure with only 201 airframes built by the time produced ended in 1960. The Tupolev 104 was only operated by Aeroflot and Czech State airline CSA. By comparison 1010 Boeing 707s were built by the time production of the last 707 variants ended in the early 1980s.

This interesting facet of the history of the jet race coupled with Cold War tensions, took place on the apron at YVR, some half century ago. And now you know the story!

On Sunday June 15, 1958, an Aeroflot TU-104 jetliner CCCP-175445 participated in an airshow held at Vancouver airport in celebrations supporting the 100th anniversary of the Canadian Province.

On Sunday June 15, 1958, an Aeroflot TU-104 jetliner CCCP-175445 participated in an airshow held at Vancouver airport in celebrations supporting the 100th anniversary of the Canadian Province.

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CLASSIC AIRLINE DVD BLOW OUT – ALL THESE DVDs $5 EACH / $7 FLAT FEE POSTAGE US/CANADA https://www.henrytenby.com/classic-airline-dvd-blow-out-all-these-dvds-5-each-7-flat-fee-postage-us-canada/ Wed, 03 Mar 2021 01:52:04 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=8331 We are clearing out the remaining copies of these classic airline DVDs – only $5 each with a $7 flat fee postage for all US / Canada orders.
(Overseas orders will be shipping at cost we will invoice the incremental amount as necessary)

Supplies are very limited. Once these are sold out, they are gone forever.

Trans-Canada Air Douglas DC-8 DVD





Trans-Canada Air Lines Vickers Viscount DVD





Classic Jetliners 1960s 2010 DVD





Air North HS748 Action - Song of the Darts DVD





Martin Mars Visit to Richmond 2010 DVD





Istanbul Ataturk International Airport 2007 Part One DVD





Istanbul Ataturk International Airport 2007 Part Two DVD





Royal Air Force Vickers VC-10 Vancouver Visit 2011 DVD





Flying the NWT Air Boeing 737-200 DVD





Air Creebec Hawker Siddeley HS748 DVD





Canadair CT-33 Silver Star In-Cockpit DVD





Yellowknife Classic Props and Jets Alive 1990s





Boeing 720 Last Flight DVD





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The Great Convair 580 Fleet – North Central Airlines, Republic, Northwest Airlines https://www.henrytenby.com/the-great-convair-580-fleet-north-central-airlines-republic-northwest-airlines/ https://www.henrytenby.com/the-great-convair-580-fleet-north-central-airlines-republic-northwest-airlines/#respond Fri, 29 Jan 2021 22:39:37 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=8321 The Great Convair 580 Fleet – North Central Airlines, Republic, Northwest Airlines – A Photo History
Photos from the Collection of Henry Tenby
Write up by Henry Tenby

The Convair-Liner was a twin-engined, pressurized airliner built for the 40-50 passenger short haul feeder market of the post World War 2 era by San Diego based Convair General Dynamics.

Republic Convair 580 N2729R DTW DEC 1980

Republic Convair 580 N2729R DTW DEC 1980.

The Convair Twine was popular in the US as pretty much all the US major operators of the 1950s ordered the Convair Twin, including Braniff, United, Delta, American, Western, Eastern, Frontier, Continental, and of course North Central Airlines, the subject of this article.

Although North Central only initially took delivery of a handful of Convair Twins in the early 1960s, additional machines were acquired through the 1960s and 70s, and by the time the airline became Republic Airlines in 1979, the Convair 580 fleet exceeded 20 examples. The Convair 580 was a sturdy well built machine that lent itself to the harsh winter operating conditions of the mid west. The primary stomping grounds for the Republic Convair 580 fleet were the “local service” small towns that dot the landscape between Chicago, Detroit and Minneapolis, as well as spanning further West through the Dakotas.

In 1986/87 Republic Airlines was acquired by Minneapolis based Northwest Airlines, the 24 Convair 580s of Republic were panted into varying degrees of Northwest Airlines’ scheme. Most were hybrid schemes.

The Convair 580 images presented here are from the slide collection of Henry Tenby.

I am looking to purchase 35mm Kodachrome aircraft slide collections. Please contact henrytenby at gmail dot com

I am looking to purchase 35mm Kodachrome aircraft slide collections. Please contact me: henrytenby at gmail dot com

Thank you very much for visiting this page, and enjoy!

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Mahalo ATR-42 Demo Flight to NWT AIR at YZF 1994 https://www.henrytenby.com/mahalo-atr-42-demo-flight-to-nwt-air-at-yzf-1994/ Wed, 29 Apr 2020 03:55:34 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=6641

Photo taken in flight on the Magalo Air ATR-42 demo flight organized by myself and the manufacturer. I just remember it was fricking cold that day. Dan Murphy, NWZt Air’s General Manager is seated far left. (Henry Tenby photo)

Yellowknife – October 28 1994: ATR42 demonstration flight to NWT Air YZF-YZF, this was a 30 minute air time local flight. The aircraft was being ferried from the ATR factory in France to Mahalo Airlines in Honolulu, Hawaii, so they stopped in to visit us at NWT Air for a demo.

At the time, one of my job responsibilities whilst employed by the airline was aircraft leasing and fleet planning and analysis. I also worked very closely in this capacity with the DFO and the Manager of Dispatch, and the Cargo Manager. I was in regular contact with the folks at ATR and we put this impromptu visit together with somewhat short notice.

Dan Murphy my boss and our General Manager is seated far left. Donna Prouse was the first female pilot at NWT Air. Did she fly for Air Tindi prior to joining NWT Air? Then Wally LeMay. I think that is Ross Drewniak on the right side window. Photos were taken by me.

Mahalo ATR-42 N985MA tech stopped in Yellowknife on October 28, 1994, to give a demo flight to NWT Air staff. (Henry Tenby photo)

View of Latham Island in Yellowknife as viewed during the ATR-42 demo flight. My home was on Latham Island at 40B Otto Drive. (Henry Tenby photo)

O

That’s the NWT Air hangar at Yellowknife airport as viewed from the Mahalo Air ATT-42. It was a bleak, cold, black and white day that October 28, 1994. You can see some Buffalo Airways planes parked at our facility.

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COVID CRISIS AT YVR – TOUR OF THE EMPTY AIRPORT https://www.henrytenby.com/covid-crisis-at-yvr-tour-of-the-empty-airport/ https://www.henrytenby.com/covid-crisis-at-yvr-tour-of-the-empty-airport/#respond Sun, 05 Apr 2020 03:15:06 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=6609

April 2, 2020
Report by Henry Tenby

As a Vancouver based aviation enthusiast with interest in the aviation hobby and business dating back to at least 1967, I was curious as to how the effects of the deepening COVID crisis were impacting our local airport. Usually a hotbed of flight activity in normal times, with loads of flights from Asia coming and going on a daily basis, I wanted to see just how much things were wound down at YVR.

So I ventured out to YVR on the afternoon of April 2, 2020, and arrived at the main terminal around 5pm. The video report above documents exactly what I observed, and to put it bluntly, the airport is a dead zone. I also went to the south side of the airport to have a look at the scene for the third level commuters and the South Terminal, and the situation over there was much the same. Within 24 hours of uploading my report video it had garnered about 1,000 views, which for me is a hell of a lot of views as my aviation videos will typically generate maybe a few hundred views within the first few weeks of posting.

Several people took the time to share their thoughts with me. And I am going to share them here in the spirit of providing an historical reference to this situation at empty airports all around the world. Let us pray that the situation will not last for more than a few months.

Ron Kosys. – Coventry UK
Somewhat disappointing to see. It brings it home to me that it isn’t just the UK aviation industry suffering at the moment. I haven’t been to BHX since the stay at home restrictions were brought in, but BHX is worse than a ghost town. Britain’s second city in terms of population airport (but less busy than MAN due to its geographical location) is now down to THREE flights per day – one Lingus, one Ryanair (both Dublin), KLM (obviously Amsterdam), and a fourth three days a week – Qatar. And that’s your lot.

Lingus are rumoured to be operating it’s last flight tomorrow as was KLM – however KLM have now requested slots for an Embraer everyday next week rather than a 737. Another business – the Airport Authority itself – that could see itself asking for a bailout. The only other flying business is a couple of freighters a day, both of which bring in spares and supplies for the NHS. You no doubt saw it on the BBC online news that ground handling companies are all in dire trouble. If they fail, especially Swissport, we’re stuffed.

The former Flybe engineering hangar is now being converted into a morgue. Consequently you simply cannot get near the old side (cargo) now, it being heavily Policed after the press shot a stack of images from the car park the other day of vehicles going in and out, and published the lot. It’s almost as though the press have a campaign of trying to frighten a proportion of the population to death.

A Motor Sich An12 was due on Wednesday, slipped to Thursday, and then Friday before arriving in the dark last night. It left as soon as the airport re-opened this morning (it’s closed overnight now due lack of traffic), also in the dark since the clocks changed. Unless you ‘bent the rules’, time it right, and went to the park at the 15 end photography now at BHX is currently not really an option. It would be just my luck for me to be the one who gets checked whilst out getting my ‘daily exercise’. I do photography for the pleasure, not for the hassle. I forgot to ask Henry, I presume there’s a gaggle of Pacific Coastal at YVR as well?

As each day goes by it appears more and more that this sad situation is going to be with us for more than a couple of months. In order for things to start getting back on their feet, the UK needs other European countries to start improving at the same time. And when that time does come, how many airlines would have bitten the dust in the meantime?

Terry Rea – Vancouver, BC
Just watched your sad but current video of our present day situation @ YVR – sad times for the city and all our YVR staff. I just retired recently after my 52 year career starting with YVR-S Airport Control Tower – trainee. It was August 1967 @ Age 18 just finished High School (PW) at my first job and loving it ! Worked the Viscounts, Vanguards, DC4s, DC6s, Super-Connies, Electras, and the UA brand new B727-100, QF B707, etc! 52 years later still enjoyed working our YVR air traffic in our present, the 3rd, ATC Control Tower!

This reminded me of my shift on 9/11; we landed many a/c @ YVR with the FAA-mandated deviations, eventually closing our N Rwy to be used for aircraft parking. We then had to take care of thousands Pax and Crew on a moment’s notice – converted our new Parkade to an emergency care center providing food, water, blankets etc while we waited for advice on what to expect next! My midnite shift next day was eerily strange, with only 1 departure the whole shift – a LR35 Medevac – 3 days later we resumed operations best we could – it was controlled chaos after 3 days of strange emptiness, such as we have now.

Things will eventually normalize but its gonna be a rough ride for the Aviation Industry for a while. What a change from last year when we were setting traffic records. Take care and stay safe!

Kevin Hickey – Calgary, Canada
Very sad footage Henry. I walked through the YYC terminal last week and it was a ghost town as well. I saw the occasional bored staff member walking around and that was it.

It also looks like a Westjet graveyard here with multiple airplanes scattered all over the aprons, taxiways, and even on runway 08/26. It almost looks like they went out of business and all of the planes are taped and sealed up, including the 767s.

Flying in here is extremely quiet on the radio now and we are constantly being given all kinds of unusual shortcuts. The sky is empty. Edmonton has some Swoops and Flairs that look like they’re going to be sitting for a while as well, about two tails each from what I could see. Hopefully this is the last time that we witness anything like this.

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KLM RETIRES PASSENGER 747 FLEET TODAY https://www.henrytenby.com/747-history-klm-retires-passenger-747-fleet-today/ https://www.henrytenby.com/747-history-klm-retires-passenger-747-fleet-today/#respond Sun, 29 Mar 2020 17:35:57 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=6566

March 29, 2020 – Vancouver, Canada
By Henry Tenby

It is with great sadness that KLM Royal Dutch Airlines retired their passenger 747-400 fleet today with the final flight being an inbound combi flight from Mexico City.

Henry Tenby with KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Henry Tenby with KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

I received a message this morning from my good friend Niels Dam who was specially in Amsterdam in the vacinity of Schiphol airport to witness the historic event of KLM’s final Boeing 747 passenger flight operating today. Amid the global economic downturn of the COVID crisis, airlines all around the world are parking their fleets in a fight for survival in the wake of evaporating passenger traffic as the world’s populations go into self-isolation mode.

Niels reported the inbound 747 from Mexico City did a wing wave while on finals, and the pilot made a special speech over the frequency thanking the world’s aviation fans for their interest in the aircraft and expressing his sadness that it was not possible for aviation fans to be present in droves for the event, due to the COVID situation, in the same way the Fokker 70 was retired from the KLM fleet back in November of 2018.

Niels Dam photographed the arrival of the last ever KLM Boeing 747-400 passenger flight at AMS Schiphol inbound from Mexico City, on Sunday, March 29, 2020.

Niels Dam photographed the arrival of the last ever KLM Boeing 747-400 passenger flight at AMS Schiphol inbound from Mexico City, on Sunday, March 29, 2020.

The authorities closed the normal spotting facilities at AMS out of respect for social distancing and public safety so those aviation fans like Niels who were on hand to bear witness to the historic event had to view the 747 landing from a distance. Niels was able to park his car in a parking lot near the airport where he was able to take a few photos as the inbound KLM 747 passed overhead on its way to the arrival runway.

KLM really had no interest in promoting or discussing the significance of their passenger 747 retirement by doing any media reachouts, discussions or assistence on the matter. A message of inquirey sent a few weeks ago to KLM’s PR office generated a two word response that nothing was planned. Which was really out of character for KLM, specially considering the massive contribution the Boeing 747 played in the development of the airlines history over the past 50 years that the type has been in service with the company.

So what of the future for KLM’s 747s? For certain the passenger fleet is officially retired and parked at Schiphol airport as we are still in early days of the COVID crisis. If the aircraft are parted out and scrapped on site or ferried elsewhere, that is surely their end of the line. That said, the fleet is well maintained and could very easily be re activated if a future return to normal warrants their use on re animated routes.

The aircraft are probably long since paid for, so it would seem in haste to initiate immediate scrapping. If we look to past history, during downturns airlines park certain fleets only to reactivate them when times are better. Let us hope this applies to the KLM 747 passenger fleet.

KLM still retains three cargo 747 freighters, two of which are in KLM livery and one of which is in Martinair livery. No phase out date has been set for these aircraft so their flying duties will continue for the foreseeable future.

As a celebration of the Boeing 747 in the KLM fleet, Niels Dam and I spent some time exploring the retired KLM 747-300 PH-BUK that now forms a cornerstone display at the Aviodrom aviation museum as presented in the photos below.

Henry Tenby doing a main gear inspection of KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands. Hydraulics look good, we need to change some balding tires for return to airworthy status!

Henry Tenby doing a main gear inspection of KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands. Hydraulics look god, we need to change some balding tires for return to airworthy status!

Under belly gear study of KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Under belly gear study of KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands looking at bit worse for wear, no this is not the boarding steps at Kinshasa, Congo!

KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands looking at bit worse for wear, no this is not the boarding steps at Kinshasa, Congo!

Niels Dam with KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Niels Dam with KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Henry Tenby with KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Henry Tenby with KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Niels Dam prepares to connect hydrant fuelling connection to KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Niels Dam prepares to connect hydrant fuelling connection to KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands, for ferry flight to Lagos!

KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Niels Dam at main cabin door of Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Niels Dam at main cabin door of Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Niels Dam relaxing in turbine inlet of KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Niels Dam relaxing in turbine inlet of KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Once familiar wing view of KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Once familiar wing view of KLM Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Upper deck cabin view of Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Upper deck cabin view of Boeing 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Henry Tenby at passenger door of KLM 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Henry Tenby at passenger door of KLM 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Flightdeck view of KLM 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Flightdeck view of KLM 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Interior main deck cabin view of KLM 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

Interior main deck cabin view of KLM 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

KLM 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

KLM 747-300 PH-BUK at Aviodrome, Netherlands.

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AIRCRAFT MODEL COLLECTION – Aviodrome Museum Netherlands https://www.henrytenby.com/aircraft-model-collection-aviodrome-museum-netherlands/ https://www.henrytenby.com/aircraft-model-collection-aviodrome-museum-netherlands/#respond Thu, 26 Mar 2020 19:27:38 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=6538

By Henry Tenby (Copyright 2020) – see below for photos.

Along with my good friend Niels Dam, I recently had the opportunity to visit the fantastic Aviodrome aviation museum in Lelystad in the Netherlands.

Given the Netherlands rich aviation history spanning back over 100 years with both KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and the famous Dutch aircraft builder Fokker, there is no shortage of vintage aircraft display models produced with the country, of which a very good sample is available for public viewing at the Aviodtome museum.

Being a huge collector of aircraft display models myself, I was extremely impressed with their collection. They had a large selection of pre World War II models made by the KLM in house model shop that was maaged by the famous Dutch model maker Hank Modermann. The highwing Fokker type models of the 1920s and 1930s featured wooden wings stained to look like the real planes.

The museum also has a number of nice wood and metal models made by Raise Up and Verkuyl between the 1940s and the 1960s. The highlight model display at the museum has to be the circa 1960 re creation of Amsterdam Schiphol airport in 1/50 scale. The KLM airliner models included in this centrepiece are the DC-3, Convair 340, Vickers Viscount, Lockheed Super Constellation, Lockheed L–188 Electra and Douglas DC-8. These models are all in wood and their accuracy and detail are magnificent. It is believed these masterpiece models were all made by Matthias Verkuyl. They would be unique pieces and I would estimate their values as priceless.

Transavia Holland707 in 1/100 metal made by Verkuyl is part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

Transavia Holland Boeing 707 in 1/100 metal made by Verkuyl is part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

KLM Vickers Viscount 800 in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Vickers Viscount 800 in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Douglas DC-8 in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Douglas DC-8 in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Convair 340 in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Convair 340 in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Lockheed L-188 Electra in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Lockheed L-188 Electra in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Vickers Viscount 800 in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Vickers Viscount 800 in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Douglas DC-7 in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Douglas DC-7 in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

KLM Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation in 1/50 scale as part of the Amsterdam Schiphol airport re creation at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Matthias Verkuyl, circa 1960.

This is a 1930s scale model replica of Amsterdam Schiphol airport, possibly made at the same time as the 1960s Schiphol replica. This display is available for viewing at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

This is a 1930s scale model replica of Amsterdam Schiphol airport, possibly made at the same time as the 1960s Schiphol replica.
This display is available for viewing at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

1950s era 1/50 wooden KLM DC-4 display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

1950s era 1/50 wooden KLM DC-4 display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

KLM Convair 340 in 1/50 scale made of wood as part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Raise Up.

KLM Convair 340 in 1/50 scale made of wood as part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. This model was likely made by Raise Up.

This is a 1/43 Lockheed factory sheet metal model of a KLM Lockheed 749 Constellation, circa late 1940s or early 1950s. This model is part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

This is a 1/43 Lockheed factory sheet metal model of a KLM Lockheed 749 Constellation, circa late 1940s or early 1950s. This model is part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

KLM Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation in 1/50 scale made of metal by Raise Up, as part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

KLM Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation in 1/50 scale made of metal by Raise Up, as part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

This is a small scale KLM Lockheed L-188 Electra in metal made by Raise Up circa early 1960s. This model is part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

This is a small scale KLM Lockheed L-188 Electra in metal made by Raise Up circa early 1960s. This model is part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

KLM Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation in 1/72 scale made of metal by Verkuyl, as part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

KLM Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation in 1/72 scale made of metal by Verkuyl, as part of the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

Large scale vintage wooden model of a Douglas DC-5 PJ-AIW circa 1940s at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

Large scale vintage wooden model of a Douglas DC-5 PJ-AIW circa 1940s at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

Large scale vintage wooden model of a KLM Lockheed Lodestar PJ-AIT circa 1940s at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

Large scale vintage wooden model of a KLM Lockheed Lodestar PJ-AIT circa 1940s at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden Fokker F.V display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden Fokker F.V display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

Miscellaneous 1920s ear wooden KLM display models at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

Miscellaneous 1920s ear wooden KLM display models at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

Vintage 1920s ear wooden KLM display model at the Aviodrome Aviation Museum. Type not indicated by the museum.

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747 SKYBAR at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport – A Report by Henry Tenby https://www.henrytenby.com/747-skybar-at-amsterdam-schiphol-airport-a-report-by-henry-tenby/ https://www.henrytenby.com/747-skybar-at-amsterdam-schiphol-airport-a-report-by-henry-tenby/#respond Mon, 16 Mar 2020 03:27:24 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=6504

Report by Henry Tenby
Copyright 2020

As a hard core aviation fan, and a frequent visitor to airports and a fan of nice bars and restaurants while on the road, I had the very pleasant surprise to find the new 747 SKYBAR at the Corendon Hotel at Amsterdam Schiphol airport. This airport is famous for their on site attraction in the form of a retired former KLM Boeing 747-400. Along with a couple of friends we went to visit the 747, which was unfortunately closed to public access, so we were unable to go inside and have a look. But we did look at the enormous airliner at ground level and took some nice photos.

As it was cold, we went into the Corendon hotel to warm up and have a tea at their lobby restaurant. We asked about the possibility to take an elevator to the top floor to take a nice photo of their 747 with a view looking down on the aircraft from a dozen stories in the air. The front desk told us we would be able to do this by visiting their 747 SKYBAR on the top floor of the hotel, when it opened during the lunch hour.

So we waited in the lobby having our teas, warming up, and then headed up to the SKYBAR as soon as it opened and we were on the very first elevator of the day. I was totally impressed when I got up there, and was blown away by the fabulous view! Yes, the view of their Corendon 747-400 was excellent, but even more impressive is the bar and restaurant facilities and the wrap around windows which afford unlimited views to Schiphol Airport and the runway action. And they even have an outdoor roof-top beer garden which although was open, it was too cold to sit and relax during the winter months. But the outdoor terrace will be an amazing place to soak up the action when the weather improves with the warmer summer months.

The staff are very friendly and welcoming, and it goes without saying the avgeeks are more than welcome to visit the bar to soak up the action, provided of course that visitors partake in drinks or items from their generous menu. Not only is the Corendon SKYBAR a day time attraction, when the sun goes down this is rapidly becoming a star attraction for the night time cocktail bar crowd and those looking for an elegant place to relax with friends in an airport environment with a fabulous skyline view of the sprawling Amsterdam airport complex.

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Bob Dros Dutch Master Aircraft Model Maker: – Interviewed by Henry Tenby https://www.henrytenby.com/bob-dros-dutch-master-aircraft-model-maker-interviewed-by-henry-tenby/ https://www.henrytenby.com/bob-dros-dutch-master-aircraft-model-maker-interviewed-by-henry-tenby/#respond Mon, 16 Mar 2020 01:08:44 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=6495

SEE BELOW FOR MORE VIDEOS IN THIS SERIES:

By Henry Tenby, copyright 2020

As a collector of professional aircraft display models for more than thirty years, I have been an admirer of the fabulously accurate and beautiful aircraft models made by Amsterdam based Bob Dros of Bel-Air Models for a very long time.

His models are painstakingly made from solid clear perspex. This is a very difficult material to work with which results in very time consuming builds. But the models are highly realistic and feature clear windows which makes them something of a unique offering in the world of high end aircraft display models.

An introduction to Bob Dros by fellow model collector Ed Van Rooijen resulted in the amazing opportunity to visit Bob Dros at his home, library and workshop in Amsterdam, where Bob ever so kindly allowed the visit to be filmed, which is presented here as a series of seven videos. In these videos Bob Dros explains the background as to how became interested in making models of aircraft, and why he chose to work in the demanding model making medium of solid perspex.

Most of Bob’s models cover the period between World War 1 and World War 2, and focus on the transport aircraft of this area of development of the early years of the airline industry. Of course he also made models or aircraft and airliners of the post war years too. All of Bob’s models were and are special custom consignments by demanding collectors from all over the world. It typically takes a few months for a model to be built as they are all built from highly accurate plans, from scratch, and in many cases Bob has developed the plans himself using a variety of sources. His goal is to build the most accurate model possible.

Please feel free to visit Bob’s models and learn more about his perspex model building efforts at www.bel-air-models.com

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Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair 2020 Was An Amazing Success – Fantastic for Models! https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-collectors-fair-2020-was-an-amazing-success-fantastic-for-models/ https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-collectors-fair-2020-was-an-amazing-success-fantastic-for-models/#respond Fri, 28 Feb 2020 23:28:26 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=6448

SEE PHOTOS BELOW – The Amsterdam Aviation Collector’s Fair was held at the Van Der Valk A4 Schiphol hotel on Sunday, February 23, 2020, and it was an amazing success! The Dutch have easily surpassed the American’s in offering what is now easily the world’s largest aviation and airline collectibles show. Most of the table stalls and vendors have airline related collectibles, but there is a broad base of aviation collectibles on offers to suite every taste. But the main specialization of offer are professional aircraft display models.

This page features two videos prepared by Henry Tenby on this amazing show, the first video (above) being a 15 minute look at the show from start to end. And the second video (below) features the fantastic selection of quality aircraft display models that were offered for sale at this show.

This year’s show featured just over the 300 tables, but it is noteworthy to mention the sheer abundance of professional aircraft display models (both airline and military) that were offered for sale at this show. I am now aware of any other show on the planet that consistently offers more display models for sale under the same roof. One would think that a country as large as the USA and with as many display model collectors as the USA would have a collectibles show dedicated to professional aircraft display models, but it is clearly not the case.

I think Americans prefer to sell their models on ebay in hopes of getting the highest price possible and do not want to take their surplus models to old school collectibles shows which are like the flea markets and antique shows of yesteryear. Which is a real shame. Selling on ebay is so impersonal and takes away from the fun of collecting, and attending real collectibles shows allows people to interact and meet new friends, and socialize with fellow collectors. Which is what I really like about attending the Amsterdam show.

Special thanks have to go to Patrick Van Rooijen and his amazing team of helpers for organizing such a to drawer show. Their efforts are extensive and span most of the year leading up to the show, and every detail is planned with military precision. The event is First Class in every respect and I am honoured to be associated with such an amazing event. For full information on next year’s show please visit their website at www.aviationfair.com for the the latest details.

Also featured below are a selection of photos from the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collector’s Fair. I hope to see you at the next year’s fair. Until then, happy collecting!

Raise Up 1/80 scale Air India Connie

Raise Up 1/80 scale Air India Connie

CIE Generale de Transport Lockheed 749 Connie metal model

CIE Generale de Transport Lockheed 749 Connie metal model

Fabulous selection of military and commercial aircraft display models for sale at the Amsterdam show.

Fabulous selection of military and commercial aircraft display models for sale at the Amsterdam show.

This is a 1/24 perspex cutaway model of a Boeing Stratocruiser

This is a 1/24 perspex cutaway model of a Boeing Stratocruiser made by Westway Models in the 1950s. It sold for a reported 20,000 euros to a model broker in Paris.

A selection of Topping Models military display models at the Amsterdam Aviation show 2020

A selection of Topping Models military display models at the Amsterdam Aviation show 2020. None of the models were priced, which I think is a bad idea.

Ed Van Rooijen's fabulous selection of vintage F28, F28 and F100 1/72 display models

Ed Van Rooijen’s fabulous selection of vintage F28, F28 and F100 1/72 display models at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2020.

Ed Van Rooijen's fabulous selection of vintage F28, F28 and F100 1/72 display models

Ed Van Rooijen’s fabulous selection of vintage F28, F28 and F100 1/72 display models at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Show.

This is a 1/100 Vogelaar Martinair Lockheed L-188 Electra which is a lovely model

This is a 1/100 Vogelaar Martinair Lockheed L-188 Electra which is a lovely model. The seller was asking 1100 Euros, which is much more than the model is worth.

Peter Casell with his wooden 1/50 DC-7 model, in need of serious restoration.

Peter Casell with his wooden 1/50 DC-7 model, in need of serious restoration.

Peter Casell with his hand made large scale flying wing model. Price was 900 Euros.

Peter Casell with his hand made large scale flying wing model with retractable landing gear. Price was 900 Euros.

Peter Casell with his hand made large scale Swissair DC-7C, which he sold at the Amsterdam Show 2020.

Peter Casell with his hand made large scale Swissair DC-7C, which he sold at the Amsterdam Show 2020.

Two 1/100 plastic DC-8 models from France, for sale at 100 Euros each at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

Two 1/100 plastic DC-8 models from France, for sale at 100 Euros each at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

A very nice 1/100 plastic Topping Models 737-200 in home country Transavia colours, circa 1975.

A very nice 1/100 plastic Topping Models 737-200 in home country Transavia colours, circa 1975. This 80 Euro model was sold at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

A 1/48 scale Swiss Air Force De Havilland Vampire model in metal.

A 1/48 scale Swiss Air Force De Havilland Vampire model in metal. A bit chunky but fairly priced at 70 Euros at the Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair 2020.

Two very nice 20 year old British Airways Pacmin models in 1/100 scale

Two very nice 20 year old British Airways Pacmin models in 1/100 scale, at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

A small scale Northwest Airlines L-199 Electra, possibly a 1/144 Raise Up model, in plastic

A small scale Northwest Airlines L-199 Electra, possibly a 1/144 Raise Up model, in plastic. Offered for sale at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

A nice selection of Swiss Air Force metal ID models of Russian military aircraft.

A nice selection of Swiss Air Force metal ID models of Russian military aircraft. Offered for sale at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

A 1950s era 1/100 scale KLM DC-6 by Raise Up

1950s era metal ID model of a Dutch Air Force F-84

My prize acquisition at the show! This is a 1950s era metal ID model of a Dutch Air Force F-84, I just love this model! I purchased it at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

KLM Vickers Viscount ashtray model in 1/200 metal by Raise Up, circa 1950s

KLM Vickers Viscount ashtray model in 1/200 metal by Raise Up, circa 1950s, offered for sale at 400 euros at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

KLM DC-4 in wood, possibly made by the KLM model shop in the 1950s

A large and impressive KLM DC-4 in wood, possibly made by the KLM model shop in the 1950s. Offered at 1150 Euros at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

Martinair Holland DC-10 in 1/100 scale by Verkuyl circa mid 1970s display model

Martinair Holland DC-10 in 1/100 scale by Verkuyl circa mid 1970s display model. Offered at 450 euros at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

Small KLM Viscount 800 in plastic circa 1950s by Raise Up

Small KLM Viscount 800 in plastic circa 1950s by Raise Up. Offered at 195 euros at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Fair.

Transavia Se210 Caravelle in 1/100 metal by Verkuyl circa early 1970s

Transavia Se210 Caravelle in 1/100 metal by Verkuyl circa early 1970s. Offered for sale at 400 euros at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Show.

KLM DC-4 circa 1950s in approximately 1/50 scale

Large metal toy like model of a KLM DC-4 circa 1950s in approximately 1/50 scale. Offered for sale at 450 euros at the 2020 Amsterdam Aviation Collectors Show.

Henry Tenby with a 1/50 Verkuyl metal DC-8-50

Henry Tenby with a 1/50 Verkuyl metal DC-8-50

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