Henry Tenby - Classic Airline DVDs / Entrepreneur / and more » Henry Tenby Aviation Reporter https://www.henrytenby.com The latest aviation and internet business news from Henry Tenby Fri, 22 Mar 2019 23:55:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 New App Aggregates Inflight Magazines from Global Airlines https://www.henrytenby.com/new-app-for-airline-inflight-magazines/ https://www.henrytenby.com/new-app-for-airline-inflight-magazines/#comments Thu, 21 Mar 2019 20:23:25 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5938

Get the Altitude Inflight Magazine app on the Apple App Store

Get the Altitude Inflight Magazine app on the Google Play store

Aggregation app brings that old seat-back staple “The Airline Inflight Magazine” into the 21st century. The airline inflight magazine was first conceived back in the 1950s and has remained unchanged for the past 60 years. The concept has now been revitalized for the 21st century.

Global travellers and frequent fliers can now download the latest inflight magazines via the brand new Altitude inflight magazines app, which is supported by a diverse group of international airlines and their inflight magazines.

Touted by its creators as a “one-stop mobile travel resource”, the Altitude Inflight Magazines App (available for iOS and Android) provides one-click download access to dozens of inflight magazines for on-the-go reading. Each participating airline’s latest inflight magazine as well as a selection of back issues for the past year are available on the app. Readers can sort magazines by airline name, magazine name, and geographic region, and receive notifications when new issues of their favorite titles are available on the platform.

According to the app’s co-creator Henry Tenby, “the Altitude Inflight Magazines App extends each airline’s most recent travel and destination articles and airline news to an engaged and affluent global readership audience that exists beyond the traditional seat-back pocket. We’re opening it up to a truly global audience.”

Vintage Airline Inflight Magazines

Old Trans-Canada Air Lines and BEA inflight magazines from the 1950s and 1960s.

The traditional airline inflight magazine has roots going all the way back into the 1950s, to the early days of the airline industry. Even back then airlines realized that passengers could be marketed to with interesting travel destination news, via a magazine or multi page all-colour printed brochure. These early inflight publications touted the airlines exciting overseas and holiday destinations which were previously accessible by lesser cost ship or rail.

The airline inflight magazines became more prevalent in the 1960s and 1970s, and by the 1990s and 2000s, pretty much every airline with a fleet of aircraft greater than a handful went to the effort to publish their own inflight magazine. The problem is the inflight magazine medium never evolved with the technology of the internet and digital access of apps. And according to Tenby “the airline inflight magazine lived a quiet existence for the last 60 years and was waiting to be let out of its shell to see the light of possibilities in the 21st century.”

Tenby explained “the inflight magazine sector was essentially ripe for disruption, and by extending the shelf life of this amazing travel content to thousands of new readers for months beyond the historical 30 day lifespan, the Altitude Inflight Magazines App enhances value for airlines and travellers alike.”

Co-creator Niels Dam, from Leeuwarden, Netherlands added “The app promotes an airline’s brand and destinations to potentially millions of global readers who may not yet be passengers, but could very well be in the future. The magic of aggregation and web app global reach.”

Altitude’s launch partner line up includes:
Adria Airways of Slovenia
Air Namibia
Air Vanuatu
Aurigny of the Channel Islands
Azerbaijan Airlines
Lao Airlines
Ukraine International Airlines

Discussions are presently in process with several interested airline partners to join the app. Altitude inflight magazine readers will find hundreds of interesting travel related articles supported by awesome photography, to feed reader interest in going to the best travel spots and luxury holiday destinations.

Altitude app is a Euro-Canadian venture with offices in Vancouver, Canada and Leeuwarden, Netherlands. Although the app is designed specially for tablets at the time of launch, phone and desktop versions will be released very soon.

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/new-app-for-airline-inflight-magazines/feed/ 0
Canadian Airlines First Boeing 747-475 Delivery December 13 1990 with Max Ward & Rhys Eyton https://www.henrytenby.com/canadian-airlines-first-boeing-747-475-delivery-december-13-1990-with-max-ward-rhys-eyton/ https://www.henrytenby.com/canadian-airlines-first-boeing-747-475-delivery-december-13-1990-with-max-ward-rhys-eyton/#comments Thu, 21 Mar 2019 18:39:54 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5923
Canadian Airlines Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" with staff flanked by Kevin Jenkins and Rhys Eyton at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Canadian Airlines Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” with staff flanked by Kevin Jenkins and Rhys Eyton at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Jerry Rudge was involved in Canadian Airlines aircraft acquisitions back in the 1980s and 1990s, and he recently gave me his collection of historical documents and photos that he had amassed in his years in the industry.

Part of this archive included a set of photos taken presumably by Boeing that were gifted to various Canadian Airlines employees on the occasion of the delivery of Canadian’s first Boeing 747-475 C-GMWW. I was gob-smacked to see these very interesting photos, specially recognizing Max Ward and his wife, as well as Canadian’s then CEO Rhys Eyton.

From the photos we can see there was a hand-over and paperwork ceremony of sorts in Seattle that was attended by various Canadian chief executives, and Boeing Commercial Airplane senior execs. Then everyone went out onto the Boeing Field apron for photos with the aircraft and Max Ward did the champaign bottle on the nose trick as the aircraft was named after him. Max Ward had the world’s best luck! He sold his Wardair airline to PWA for half a billion dollars in 1987, which would be like 4 billion dollars in today’s dollars! And his airline was in trouble and could very well have failed given the deregulating Canadian airline marketplace. He sure pulled one over on Ryhs Eyton and the Canadian Board. Some people believe Canadian could have survived probably even to this very day had they not made such an unwise move to purchase Wardair. I personally agree with that point. Anyhow, that is a whole different story.

Max Ward and his wife Marjorie on hand for the handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines' first Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Max Ward and his wife Marjorie on hand for the handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines’ first Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

After the christening ceremony the Canadian Boeing 747-475 was presumably ferried up to Vancouver. The Canadian Airlines in house newspaper reported on their new Boeing 747-475 the following month, which provided interesting insight into how the new 747-400 was deployed in its first months of revenue service with Canadian Airlines:

It’s A New Ball Game With The New Boeing 747-400

While Canadian continues to build on its global alliances, the arrival of the two 747-475 aircraft will have a dramatic impact on the company’s global strategy when the new international schedule begins April 7, 1991.

Canadian Airlines Boeing 747-400 early 1990s Video streams on http://www.jetflix.tv

Canadian Airlines Boeing 747-400 early 1990s Video streams on http://www.jetflix.tv

Canadian’s first 392-seat B747-400, which arrived in December will replace the 225-seat DC-10 on the Vancouver-Tokyo route, providing a 30 per cent increase in capacity on one of Canadian’s most profitable routes. With no more slots available at Narita Airport, Canadian is in a growth position unique among all carriers seeking to grow in that market. The second 747-400, which arrived on February 15, 1991, will begin service on the Vancouver- Hong Kong-Bangkok
Return route.

“It’s not just that we are increasing our capacity,” explains Ian Bootle, Vice President International. “These are very high-yield long-haul routes where customers have expressed a preference for this aircraft type.” In fact, the 747-400 offers 60 Business Class seats compared to only 34 on the DC 10.The international schedule features increased frequency to most other key markets as a result of Canadian‘s commercial alliances. “Alliances allow us to maintain our extensive worldwide network of destinations, increase the frequency of flights, and find new markets to serve” says Bootle. “Increasing our frequency to daily service provides improved market penetration particularly in attracting high yield customers. As well, alliances allow us to share the cost of operating and promoting the routes.”

Canadian Airlines Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" pre delivery at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990.

Canadian Airlines Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” pre delivery at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990.

Canadian has commercial agreements with JAL, Lufthansa, SAS, Qantas, Air New Zealand, Air France, Alitalia, China Airlines, and Garuda Airways.

Europe

Canadian has expanded its agreement with Lufthansa to increase the number of flights from Western Canada from 12 to 14 times a week compared with 1990. As well, Lufthansa will participate in the three weekly Toronto-Munich flights, using B767 aircraft. The SAS agreement will continue to see Toronto-Copenhagen service three times weekly.

With enhancement of the Air France alliance Canadian will serve Toronto-Paris daily, including four weekly non-stops, and Montreal-Paris daily. Service to Italy will feature eight flights a week, up one from last year.

Canadian Airlines Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" departing Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, on delivery to Vancouver.

Canadian Airlines Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” departing Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, on delivery to Vancouver.

The new United Kingdom schedule will better tailor capacity with demand. The Dayliner/Starliner series will not operate this summer, instead Canadian will introduce four evening services from London to Toronto aimed primarily at the business traveller to complement the daily Toronto-London service. Canadian is also introducing three non-stop Toronto-Manchester flights. Canadian will continue to operate the only non-stop service between Ottawa-London. Daily service will be maintained between Western Canada and Britain.

North Pacific

Although Canada to Japan service will increase only one flight to 18 flights a week from 1990, the change to B747-400 adds 30 per cent capacity. Vancouver-Tokyo and Toronto-Tokyo remain unchanged at 10 times weekly and three times weekly, respectively. Calgary-Edmonton-Tokyo resumes a once
weekly flight (Sundays). Canadian also plans to increase Vancouver-Nagoya
flights from three to four times weekly.

Kevin Jenkins top of the stairs, with CAIL air crew of Canadian Airlines' first Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Kevin Jenkins top of the stairs, with CAIL air crew of Canadian Airlines’ first Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Canadian will maintain nine weekly flights to Hong Kong and five to Bangkok, but the new schedule now sees twice weekly scheduled service to Taipei. The 8747-400 will have a 30 per cent capacity impact on these routes as well. South Pacific The new commercial agreement with Qantas will allow Canadian to serve the land downunder as never before with daily flights from Vancouver to Sydney, up from three flights weekly, and new daily service to Melbourne. Through an agreement with Air New Zealand, Vancouver-Auckland will increase to six times a week, up three flights from 1990. Vancouver-Nadi go from three weekly to four times a week, using a combination of Air New Zealand and Qantas south of Honolulu. Service from Toronto to the South Pacific, including Sydney, Auckland, and Nadi will remain essentially unchanged from 1990.

Latin America

Frequency to Mexico City, which began with one weekly flight last November,
and to Lima will double to twice weekly. These destinations will feature B767 aircraft, replacing the DC-lO. In fact, all service to Latin America will use B767 equipment by early September. Frequency to Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires and Santiago will remain unchanged from 1990 with twice weekly to each destination.

Max Ward's wife and Rhys Eyton and others christening Canadian Airlines' first Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Max Ward’s wife and Rhys Eyton and others christening Canadian Airlines’ first Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Canadian Airlines flight attendants on hand for the delivery of Canadian Airlines' first Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Canadian Airlines flight attendants on hand for the delivery of Canadian Airlines’ first Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Canadian Airlines top brass on hand for the handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines' first Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Canadian Airlines top brass on hand for the handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines’ first Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Most likely Boeing staff on hand for the handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines' first Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Most likely Boeing staff on hand for the handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines’ first Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Max Ward and his wife Marjorie on hand for the handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines' first Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

Max Ward and his wife Marjorie on hand for the handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines’ first Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

A Boeing exec presents a delivery certificate to Rhys Eyton. This was the special handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines' first Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

A Boeing exec presents a delivery certificate to Rhys Eyton. This was the special handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines’ first Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver.

CAIL Chief Executive Rhys Eyton on the podium. This was the special handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines' first Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver. The video of this event stream at http://www.jetflix.tv

CAIL Chief Executive Rhys Eyton on the podium. This was the special handover ceremony of Canadian Airlines’ first Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver. The video of this event stream at http://www.jetflix.tv

Canadian Airlines' first Boeing 747-475 "Maxwell Ward" at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver. The video of this event stream at http://www.jetflix.tv

Canadian Airlines’ first Boeing 747-475 “Maxwell Ward” at Boeing Field, December 13, 1990, prior to delivery to Vancouver. The video of this event stream at http://www.jetflix.tv

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/canadian-airlines-first-boeing-747-475-delivery-december-13-1990-with-max-ward-rhys-eyton/feed/ 0
Aircraft Fill Enthusiast’s Every Waking Hour – Henry Tenby in Yellowknife 1992 https://www.henrytenby.com/aircraft-fill-enthusiasts-every-waking-hour-henry-tenby-in-yellowknife-1992/ https://www.henrytenby.com/aircraft-fill-enthusiasts-every-waking-hour-henry-tenby-in-yellowknife-1992/#comments Wed, 13 Mar 2019 22:22:40 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5893 by Francis Thompson, Norther News Service, Monday, August 3, 1992
Yellowknife

Henry Tenby has become a regular sight on the rocks behind the Air Tindi float base, where he spends much of his spare time getting pictures of exotic float planes.

Henry Tenby has become a regular sight on the rocks behind the Air Tindi float base, where he spends much of his spare time getting pictures of exotic float planes.

Talking to Henry Tenby is like discovering a new and exotic culture. Tenby is an aviation enthusiast, and airplanes occupy most of his waking life.

He works for an airline, builds model airplanes in his spare time, spends his evenings down by the Air Tindi float base in Yellowknife’s Old Town, waiting to ambush out-of-town float planes with his camera. He exchanges letters with airplane buffs around the world, and even helps organize conventions for enthusiasts.

Apart from taking and trading photos of airplanes, Henry Tenby has also amassed a large collection of airplane models, and is seen here admiring an NWT Air Hercules in his Yellowknife office.

Apart from taking and trading photos of airplanes, Henry Tenby has also amassed a large collection of airplane models, and is seen here admiring an NWT Air Hercules in his Yellowknife office.

In the aviation culture, every artifact is collectible: old schedules, swizzle sticks from drinks, playing cards, even vomit bags.

Most importantly, airplane buffs collect pictures of airplanes. Ramp shots, they call them: planes on airport tarmacs, with no people or baggage trains in view.

“It‘s like a little confraternity,” says Larry Milberry, a publisher of aviation books who was in the N.W.T. last week to visit Tenby and bone up on his Northern aviation history.

“When they get together, they have what I view as infernal slide shows,” Milberry says. The buffs will watch tray after tray of airplane slides, for hours at a time, he says.

“This is like a world—wide hobby,” Milberry says “it’s huge for example in Japan . . . The airplane spotters in Britain are absolute maniacs.”

40,000 slides

Tenby is a bit of a non-conformist within the aviation culture, because he likes to take pictures of airplanes in flight, and hopes one day to put together a book of air-to-air photos.

At the ripe age of 28, he has already collected 40,000 plane slides, of which he estimates he
probably shot 15,000 himself.

But then again, he first got interested in aviation back in 1967.

“My grandmother took me out to the observation deck at Vancouver airport,” he says. “It was love at first sight.”

Back home in Vancouver, he has 50 airline display models of fibreglass. “I don’t own a home big enough to store them all,” he says.

When Tenby graduated from school, he went to North Dakota to do a bachelors in aviation. He then went on to do a masters in business administration.

Tenby got a job in Seattle with an aircraft-leasing company. But when the company tried to transfer him to a job in Peru, the scene of a nasty civil war, Tenby balked.

He called up an acquaintance at NWT Air and got work with the airline, choosing planes and helping with budgeting and scheduling.

“Yellowknife is fascinating from an aviation standpoint,” Tenby says.

The fact that many Northern communities are only accessible by air and the large number of float planes in the North make Yellowknife an ideal spot for the hard-core aviation buff, he says.

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/aircraft-fill-enthusiasts-every-waking-hour-henry-tenby-in-yellowknife-1992/feed/ 2
Top 10 Reasons Why Amsterdam Schiphol is My Favourite Airport! https://www.henrytenby.com/top-10-reasons-why-amsterdam-schiphol-is-my-favourite-airport/ https://www.henrytenby.com/top-10-reasons-why-amsterdam-schiphol-is-my-favourite-airport/#comments Sat, 09 Mar 2019 16:36:35 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5857 Schiphol Airport Gets Top Marks As Rated By World Travel Enthusiast Henry Tenby

Henry Tenby thoroughly enjoying his time soaking up the action on the open air observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol airport.

Henry Tenby thoroughly enjoying his time soaking up the action on the open air observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol airport.

As an avid world traveller for most of the half century I have been on this planet, and a full-fledged airline freak, I have spent a lot of time over the passing decades visiting airports for fun, travel, leisure and business. I am one of those people who actually loves spending time at an airport, soaking up the atmosphere, watching aircraft, hanging out at the gate, or putting my feet up in my favourite lounges.

That said, not all airports are equal when it comes to checking all the check boxes for the items that make a fun and memorable airport visit, in my books. But Amsterdam Airport is one of those airports that is a full-fledged destination in its own right, that as an aviation fan I can spend an entire 2-3 days visit encamped at and thoroughly enjoy my time.

It has a hell of a lot to offer, the time passes quickly, and it is an airport that I always enjoy visiting and look forward to visiting again. For all of the reasons I present below, Amsterdam Schiphol airport is actually my favourite airport in the entire world!

1. World Class Observation Deck
Certainly in North America, open air observation decks are a thing of the distant past. God forbid airports in North America can offer such a lovely facility to their community. They will say it cannot be done due to security concerns. What a load of bollocks. I am not going to get into that debate but I will say the more family orientated you make your airport, the better a place it will be and you end up with a wold class airport, not a highly crowded, unpleasant box of a building that processes passengers in a boring, sterile environment. Airport planners the world over need to take a page from the book at Amsterdam Schiphol!

An aviation enthusiast's dream come true! A lovely open air observation deck with expansive views of the whole airport is what awaits visitors to Amsterdam's famous Schiphol airport.

An aviation enthusiast’s dream come true! A lovely open air observation deck with expansive views of the whole airport is what awaits visitors to Amsterdam’s famous Schiphol airport.

The large open expanse of the open air observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol is a tourist attraction in its own right. The locals love visiting this location to spend time with children and families while at the airport. It is such a lovely feature that most airports have completely ignored as we approach the 2020s.

The large open expanse of the open air observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol is a tourist attraction in its own right. The locals love visiting this location to spend time with children and families while at the airport. It is such a lovely feature that most airports have completely ignored as we approach the 2020s.

Another fine view of the busy activity at Amsterdam Schiphol airport as viewed from the lovely open air observation terrace.

Another fine view of the busy activity at Amsterdam Schiphol airport as viewed from the lovely open air observation terrace.

2. Airliner On Top Of The Observation Deck
The real crowning touch for an airline buff, in addition to having an open air observation deck that is not behind thick glass or chain link fence, is to have an actual airliner on the said open air observation deck that you can actually go inside and soak up the atmosphere. Either rest your feet by taking a seat in the passenger cabin, or pay a visit to the flight deck. The choice is yours at Amsterdam Schiphol! They get top marks on this attribute. How many airports in the world other than Amsterdam Schiphol offer an actual, fully complete airliner that you can visit, that sits on top of their observation deck? The answer is zero!

Another nice view of KLM Fokker 100 atop the observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol airport. A popular destination for kids!

Another nice view of KLM Fokker 100 atop the observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol airport. A popular destination for kids!

Nice under belly view of the KLM Fokker 100 that sits atop the observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol airport. You can even go inside the Fokker 100 to take a seat or view the flightdeck.

Nice under belly view of the KLM Fokker 100 that sits atop the observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol airport. You can even go inside the Fokker 100 to take a seat or view the flightdeck.

KLM Fokker 100 on display on top of the observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport.

KLM Fokker 100 on display on top of the observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport.

Why not take a visit to the KLM Fokker 100 that sits atop the observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol airport. You can take a seat to rest your feet, or view the flight deck.

Why not take a visit to the KLM Fokker 100 that sits atop the observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol airport. You can take a seat to rest your feet, or view the flight deck.

A trademark Amsterdam Schiphol view. The KLM Fokker 100 that sits atop the observation deck is framed with the Schiphol control tower. You can take a photo just like this yourself, all you have to do is visit the Schiphol observation terrace next time you are lucky enough to be in Amsterdam.

A trademark Amsterdam Schiphol view. The KLM Fokker 100 that sits atop the observation deck is framed with the Schiphol control tower. You can take a photo just like this yourself, all you have to do is visit the Schiphol observation terrace next time you are lucky enough to be in Amsterdam.

3. The Airport is Home to the World’s Oldest Airline
This year 2019 is the year that KLM will be celebrating its 100th birthday. Very few other world airlines will hit this milestone soon. Perhaps Avianca, and Lufthansa might be getting close. But Lufthansa is not the continuation of the same company as it was re organized after World War 2 as new company. Whereas KLM has been a continuation of the very same company since its initial founding just a few years after the end of World War One! I love KLM, it is a great airline, the staff are super friendly and nice, and their global brand and image with the trademark blue and the Royal crown are recognizable the world over. You’d have to be living at the bottom of the ocean or under a rock to not be instantly familiar with the KLM Royal Dutch airline brand. It is a great airline that is headquartered at a great airport, and for me, that counts a lot!

Of course KLM and Schiphol airport are joined at the hip, and have been for about 100 years now! This nice view is from the shopping concourse windows which are plentiful, once you pass through the security checks to board your flight.

Of course KLM and Schiphol airport are joined at the hip, and have been for about 100 years now! This nice view is from the shopping concourse windows which are plentiful, once you pass through the security checks to board your flight.

4. The Airport Still Has Plenty of Passenger 747-400s On Scheduled Flights
A great airport has to be served by great aircraft, this is a must! If an airport only has boring airplanes then the airport gets very low marks in my books. This is my strong view as a hard-core airline freak.

Ideally I want to be able to fly out of an airport on classic jetliners. Of course the vintage first generation jetliners like the 707 and DC-8 are long gone (with exception to a small number of air forces that still operate some airframes as military and VIP transports and refuel birds). But that does not mean you have to accept second best like Airbus 340s or 767-200s. Today, I believe the 747-400 pax bird is the best classic jetliner you can possibly fly on.

All the US carriers have sadly dumped the 747-400s from their fleets. How stupid, given the aircraft are so iconic, safe, reliable and offer the passengers such a high level of comfort and passenger appeal. To phase them out in favour of plastic new gen Airbus and Boeing aircraft was premature thinking. Just look across the north Atlantic for common sense and inspiration. We have Lufthansa in Germany still operating their 747-400 classics. And of course we have KLM Royal Dutch Airlines still operating their beautiful fleet of Boeing 747-400 classics, all based from Amsterdam Schiphol airport. Where you can still fly on them on select North American routes and Caribbean routes to the ABC Islands.

KLM still operates a magnificent fleet of Boeing 747-400 classics. But sadly their days are numbered as the 747-400 fleet will be gradually retired over the next few years. What not a better place to see them at than Amsterdam's famous Schiphol airport.

KLM still operates a magnificent fleet of Boeing 747-400 classics. But sadly their days are numbered as the 747-400 fleet will be gradually retired over the next few years. What not a better place to see them at than Amsterdam’s famous Schiphol airport.

Nice big nose view! KLM 747-400 classic PH-BFW at the gate at Amsterdam's famous Schiphol airport.

Nice big nose view! KLM 747-400 classic PH-BFW at the gate at Amsterdam’s famous Schiphol airport.

Amother very nice view of a KLM 747-400 classic PH-BFW at gate at Amsterdam's famous Schiphol airport.

Amother very nice view of a KLM 747-400 classic PH-BFW at the gate at Amsterdam’s famous Schiphol airport.

5. The Lounge Has A 20 Out Of 10 Apron View
Not only do I like spending time at airports, I also very much enjoy my rest and relaxation time at the airport lounges. To be hurdled about an airport with the teaming hoards of Calcutta is not my idea of a good time. Thank you very much. I prefer to be in a quiet, luxurious lounge where I can put my feet up, check my emails, read, have a nice meal, enjoy a drink or two, or perhaps have a quiet snooze while I pass the time waiting for my flight. I would not think of travelling without having access to the lounge at any airport I happen to pass through on my travels.

That said, there are a lot of superb lounges that I have visited at airports pretty much everywhere. But, so far, I have only found two airport lounges that offer unparalleled views of the apron activity that is worthy of pulling out a camera to shoot photos or video. One being the old Air Canada Aeroplan lounge at LAX that was atop the concourse which offered fabulous airfield views, but I think this has since closed or been moved to a less impressive vantage point. The other, which exists today, is the international departures lounge at Amsterdam Schiphol airport.

This is a 20 out of 10 lounge in my books. The main reason being that it offers excellent amenities, good food and drink, and most importantly, the view from the windows is a full-on expanse of the apron activity below. The chairs are super comfy, it is a large and airy open space, and you can sit here watching the world go by and the time waiting for your flight’s boarding time will pass all too quickly. Actually far too quickly than you would want. Because if you are like me, you will want to spend an extended period of time in the lounge because it is so good.

The airline lounge (airside post security) offers a smashing view of the airfield and aircraft and is a great place to spend quality time relaxing before your flight. The lounge offers a wide selection of drinks and snacks but can get busy so be sure to budget your time accordingly. The walking distance from the lounge to the furthest gates can take 15-20 minutes during peak period. Whatever time you get to spend in the lounge, it will be well worth it!

The airline lounge (airside post security) offers a smashing view of the airfield and aircraft and is a great place to spend quality time relaxing before your flight. The lounge offers a wide selection of drinks and snacks but can get busy so be sure to budget your time accordingly. The walking distance from the lounge to the furthest gates can take 15-20 minutes during peak period. Whatever duration of time you get to spend in the lounge, it will be well worth it!

6. Any Airport With a Boeing 747 I Can Sleep In Is Top of My List!
This is not a pipe dream! Very soon (late 2019) you will be able to sleep on board a de-commissioned KLM Boeing 747-400 at the Corendon Hotel at Schiphol airport. This will be the first time a retired airliner has been deployed as a boutique hotel at a world class airport location. The KLM Boeing 747-400 was retired last year and in early February of 2019, the big jet was re-positioned from the active area of the airport to its new hotel location (adjacent to the ibis) during the dead of night moving at a snail’s pace using a specially designed roller transport system. It will take several months for the 747 to be retrofitted with a new hotel accommodation interior. This amazing landmark is just another layer of icing on the cake as to why Amsterdam Schiphol airport has ten reasons why it my favourite airport in the world, and all the other airports in the world are not!

If sleep in a de-commissioned KLM 747-400 is on your bucket list, the Corendon Hotel at Amsterdam Schiphol airport is your ticket! Later this year they will open their 747 hotel for guest visits, and I cannot wait to take them up on it! The best room will have to be those in the upper deck just behind the flight deck. Or the rooms over wing with nice engine views. I wonder if the beds will have an option rumble mode to simulate engine cruise at FL 390. (photo by Anthony Hickey, Schiphol Feb 24, 2019)

If sleep in a de-commissioned KLM 747-400 is on your bucket list, the Corendon Hotel at Amsterdam Schiphol airport is your ticket! Later this year they will open their 747 hotel for guest visits, and I cannot wait to take them up on it! The best room will have to be those in the upper deck just behind the flight deck. Or the rooms over wing with nice engine views. I wonder if the beds will have an option rumble mode to simulate engine cruise at FL 390. (photo by Anthony Hickey, Schiphol Feb 24, 2019)

7. The Airport Has An Interesting Mix Of Traffic
Not all airports are created equally in this department. Some hub airports are dead boring. If an airport is 95% Delta or Ryanair it can get pretty boring for the visiting aviation fan rather quickly. This is not the case here at Amsterdam Schiphol. To the contrary, Schiphol has an excellent mix of international traffic and the observation deck is never a boring place. Some of the Amsterdam aviation locals have become part of the furniture, just like at Heathrow where grizzled spotters with telescopes have been encamped at their posts since before Wham! split up. If not longer (since the Beatles broke up!) Airlines from former Dutch colonies feature quite heavily at Schiphol including Surinam Airways and Garuda Indonesia. Delta maintains an impressive presence with some 10 plus flights daily to various US gateway cities. An interesting mix of cargo jets from Asia add to the flavour to make this European hub airport one of the best on the Continent, easily on a par with Frankfurt.

Make a wish! Singapore Airlines Airbus A350 framed with a rainbow at Amsterdam Schiphol airport as seen from the boarding gate windows.

Make a wish! Singapore Airlines Airbus A350 framed with a rainbow at Amsterdam Schiphol airport as seen from the boarding gate windows.

Privilege Triple Seven 300ER "Auria" at Amsterdam Schiphol airport viewed from the boarding gate.

Privilege Triple Seven 300ER “Auria” at Amsterdam Schiphol airport viewed from the boarding gate.

Typical view from the observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport.

Typical view from the observation deck at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport.

A Delta A330 pushes back off the gate at Amsterdam Schiphol airport as viewed from the magnificent open air observation deck.

A Delta A330 pushes back off the gate at Amsterdam Schiphol airport as viewed from the magnificent open air observation deck.

Garuda Indonesia 777-300ER having been pushed back from departure at Amsterdam Schiphol airport.

Garuda Indonesia 777-300ER having been pushed back from departure at Amsterdam Schiphol airport.

8. Any Airport With a Local Aviation Hobby Shop Gets Tops Marks
It was the British to created the airport based hobby shop concept back in the 1970s, with Brian Austria-Tomkins and his Executive Display Models based at the Sheraton Skyline Hotel at Heathrow airport. His lovely models were extremely expensive back in the 1990s, which was when I used to visit the shop to admire the fabulous models offered for sale. The Executive Display Models were primarily the domain of the resident oil sheiks who had models produced of their personal aircraft. I would take the bus from Heathrow over to the hotel just to dream about the models, and I have many memories of being outside the front of the Sheraton Skyline and watching the Concorde on full power take-off thundering down the runway reaching skyward for New York or Miami.

Just an easy ten minute bus ride from the Schiphol central bus station will take you to the world famous Aviation MegaStore which is the world’s largest aviation hobby shop. It is a destination in its own right for aviation fans, modellers, diecast and display model collectors, and pilots. The shop has a huge selection of hard-to-find aviation books and models curated from the four corners of the globe.

Half the floor space is dedicated to diecast airliner models, and there is whole room filled with filing cabinets loaded to the rafters with decals sheets, also curated from decal producers all over the world. It is not a problem to spend several hours at this shop checking out all they have to offer. The difficult task is narrowing down what you are going to purchase, unless you have an unlimited hobby budget. (Which I think many of you do have!)

The Aviation Mega Store on the perimeter of Amsterdam Schiphol airport has to be the world's largest aviation hobby shop under one roof. They offer a massive selection of aviation books, models, hobby supplies, and even a Boeing 737 flight simulator. Situated at 249 Molenweg in Aalsmeerderbrug, the shop is only 10 minutes by bus from the Schiphol central bus station.

The Aviation Mega Store on the perimeter of Amsterdam Schiphol airport has to be the world’s largest aviation hobby shop under one roof. They offer a massive selection of aviation books, models, hobby supplies, and even a Boeing 737 flight simulator.
Situated at 249 Molenweg in Aalsmeerderbrug, the shop is only 10 minutes by bus from the Schiphol central bus station.

9. The Attached Shopping Centre Is Excellent With Fair Prices
For a hard-core airline buff, you would not think that the presence of a shopping centre is of much importance when rating favourite airports. But it actually is, for several reasons. I use the airport as a frequent transit point between the hotel, city centre visits, and other side trips in the region. I find myself passing through the airport quite frequently when I visit cities for airline shows and aviation conventions. Often the food at hotels is costly and under par as they have a captive client base.

The Amsterdam Schiphol airport shopping centre is fantastic, and I love spending time there. The Albert Heijn supermarket offers a fabulous selection of high quality, and healthy, foods, salads, pre-made sandwiches, and yummy snacks that you simply will not find at North American airports. North American airports are all about pushing unhealthy, waist expanding comfort foods, like hamburger, pasta and pizza. The nice news at Schiphol is that you can eat healthy for very reasonable cost. Sure, they have the bad food choices too like Burger King, but there are more than enough healthy food options including the fantastic “la Place” French buffet restaurant, which is my favourite dining location at Schiphol airport. This buffet per unit costing so you pay for what you take, but the home-style cooking and fantastic atmosphere is well worth the price of admission.

At Amsterdam Schiphol airport shopping centre they have a very diverse selection of shops, with prices quite similar to what you would pay off airport. Which is a refreshing change from the elevated prices that shops charge at most other airports. I stopped in at the Rituals shop and bought some of their nice skin products, and recommend you pay them a visit if you’d like your skin to look and smell great. They are a Dutch company and I really like their products.

The fun at Amsterdam Schiphol airport is not only confined to the observation deck. The airport offers a fantastic shopping mall as well, with an excellent selection of shops and restaurants as well as several Albert Heijn grocery stores for value priced food. There is an an aviation hobby shop where you can book tickets for an airport tour.

The fun at Amsterdam Schiphol airport is not only confined to the observation deck. The airport offers a fantastic shopping mall as well, with an excellent selection of shops and restaurants as well as several Albert Heijn grocery stores for value priced food. There is an an aviation hobby shop where you can book tickets for an airport tour.

10. The Airport Is An Easy Commute To A World Top 10 Best City
No offence, but Toronto, Dallas-Fort Worth, and Dubai may all have excellent airports, but I personally would not classify those cities as world’s best destinations. Not even close. If I am passing through YYZ, DFW, or DXB I certainly do not feel compelled to break my journey to visit the city centre to soak up the action for a touristic visit, because the airport host city is overflowing with things to see and do for the tourist.

This is absolutely not the case with Schiphol Airport and the lovely city of Amsterdam. If you have not already been to see Amsterdam, then you have to make it part of your plan next time you pass through Amsterdam Schiphol airport to make the quick and easy journey from the airport to the city centre. Amsterdam and its famous canals is beautiful.

It is a great walking city with so much to see and do. You can easily spend a full day sight-seeing, all by foot, and you will be sure to fall in love with this destination. During my last visit, just a few weeks ago, I took the city bus directly from the airport to Leidseplein Square, the bus ticket was about 10 Euros return. I did a big circle route which took me to Antiek Centrum, Prinsengracht, Singel, and then to the Rijks Museum, and finally back to Leidseplein.

I stopped for a bite to eat at Albert Heijn whenever I felt hungry, but there were other neat food options everywhere you looked. Everything from stroopwaffel to haringhandel to Surinamese food to Falafel, Donair and pizza is readily available to suit every palate. The city of Amsterdam operates with a very high load factor and of course there are a loads of tourists, and foot traffic can be busy on the main streets. That said, without a doubt, no visit to Amsterdam Schiphol airport would be complete with a visit to the old city centre of Amsterdam.

Even if you are a hard core airline freak, when visiting Amsterdam you have to take a break from the airport and head into Amsterdam for a day of exploring this amazing water city. It is a 20 out of 10 city, take it from Henry Tenby that you won't be disappointed!

Even if you are a hard core airline freak, when visiting Amsterdam you have to take a break from the airport and head into Amsterdam for a day of exploring this amazing water city. It is a 20 out of 10 city, take it from Henry Tenby that you won’t be disappointed!

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/top-10-reasons-why-amsterdam-schiphol-is-my-favourite-airport/feed/ 0
Air Canada Retires the Vickers Viscount April 27, 1974 – End of An Era https://www.henrytenby.com/air-canada-retires-the-vickers-viscount-april-27-1974-end-of-an-era/ https://www.henrytenby.com/air-canada-retires-the-vickers-viscount-april-27-1974-end-of-an-era/#comments Sat, 09 Mar 2019 13:38:50 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5820 FLASHBACK 1974: AIR CANADA CAPTAIN J. R. DESMARIAS RECALLS THE AIRLINE’S HISTORY WITH THIS REMARKABLE TURBO-PROP AIRLINER

Air Canada Vickers Viscount CF-TGT is serviced between flights at Vancouver's old South Terminal Building in June of 1967. This particular Viscount was delivered to TCA on August 4, 1955, and was WFU in 1969. She was broken up at Winnipeg in 1970.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount CF-TGT is serviced between flights at Vancouver’s old South Terminal Building in June of 1967. This particular Viscount was delivered to TCA on August 4, 1955, and was WFU in 1969. She was broken up at Winnipeg in 1970.

CLICK HERE to read about the Air Canada Vanguard Last Flight

The landing of two Air Canada Viscounts at Toronto and Montreal April, 27 marked the retirement of the short-haul aircraft that have been a familiar sight in Canadian skies for 19 years.

Trans-Canada Air Lines Vickers Viscount DVD

Trans-Canada Air Lines Vickers Viscount DVD available here

The last 24 Viscounts have been sold to two Montreal firms, United Aviation Services Ltd. and Beaver Enterprises Ltd. In all, Air Canada and its predecessor Trans-Canada Air Lines purchased 51 of the British built machines.

The Viscount was the first turbine-powered airplane to be used on this continent, and it was in April, 1955, that Trans-Canada Air Lines first put it on scheduled daily service between Montreal and Winnipeg, with stopovers at Toronto and Fort William, Ont., now Thunder Bay.

The first flight was piloted by Capt. Walter Kent, now retired and living in Toronto, and its first officer was Capt. D. F. Tribe, who lives in Vancouver and now flies Air Canada Boeing 747s.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount on board pre departure from Ottawa circa 1966. This photo was supplied by

Air Canada Vickers Viscount on board pre departure from Ottawa circa 1966. This photo was supplied by “Breathnach” and seeing the interior of an Air Canada Viscount from the mid 1960s is pure magic, as it is such a rare image. The passengers are nicely relaxed reading their papers, while the flight attendant up front greets a boarding passenger with a newspaper. A Viscount memory from half a century ago frozen in time.

The first Viscount was delivered to Montreal from Wisley, England, with enroute technical stops made in Scotland, lceland, Greenland and Labrador back in December, 1954.

Manufactured by Vickers Armstrong, the Viscounts were delivered to their Canadian owners over a period of five years. TCA bought 51 of the little workhorses, and the large sale to a North American customer helped give British aviation technology a much-needed shot in the arm. Nearly 500 Viscounts were sold over the years, giving the aircraft the distinction of being one of the most successful commercial aircraft produced by Great Britain.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount CF-TIE at London, Ontario in September of 1966 with the company of a sistership. London was a sked Air Canada destination from Toronto Malton for Air Canada Viscounts and even Vanguards in the 1960s and early 1970.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount CF-TIE at London, Ontario in September of 1966 with the company of a sistership. London was a sked Air Canada destination from Toronto Malton for Air Canada Viscounts and even Vanguards in the 1960s and early 1970s.

And for TCA’s passengers, it gave them the opportunity to ride aboard not just another “prop-job” but on an aircraft that would play the key role in aviation history by bridging the gap between the era of piston engines and the dawn of the jet age.

The 81-foot long, four-engine Vis-count was the darling of cabin and cockpit crews alike. “It was a beautiful airplane, and we all loved it,” recalls Mrs. L. l. (Billie) Houseman, Air Canada’s chief stewardess for many years.

The aircraft had a galley and coat room in the rear, with two lavatories in the from. As its main visual feature, it had huge oval-shaped windows whose drapes, made of hand-woven plaid, were designed by Karen Bulow of Montreal.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount awaits passengers at London, Ontario in September of 1966. London was a regular schedule destination for Air Canada Viscounts and even Vanguards in the 1960s and early 1970s.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount awaits passengers at London, Ontario in September of 1966. London was a regular schedule destination for Air Canada Viscounts and even Vanguards in the 1960s and early 1970s.

“Work was made very easy for the two stewardesses on board. And another thing: the plane was beautifully quiet,” Mrs. Houseman recalled.

Trans Canada Airlines Viscount NorthStar Lodestar vintage movies from the 1950s stream on JetFlix TV

Trans Canada Airlines Viscount NorthStar Lodestar vintage movies from the 1950s stream on JetFlix TV

The fact that the Viscount was considered a “silent” aircraft was rendered more evident by its comparison with the Canadair DC-4M2 North Star, powered by four roaring Merlin piston engines. The same engine that powers the famous Spitfire and Mustang fighters of World War two fame. Next to them, turbo-props sounded almost like whispers.

Pierre Charbonneau, now a captain on Lockheed L-1011 aircraft, remembers with fondness the 12 years he spent flying Viscounts across the land. And he, too, extols the plane’s quiet virtues.

“There was no noise, no vibrations,” Capt. Charbonneau said. “You put a five cent piece on a table or on an arm rest, and it would not even quiver. For those days, that was quite remarkable.”

Air Canada Vickers Viscount CF-THY at Toronto Malton April 1972.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount CF-THY at Toronto Malton April 1972.

The captain added that “the Viscount was an extremely versatile airplane for its time. It showed high reliability and efficiency. The Viscount’s four Rolls-Royce Dart engines were so proficient that they hardly offered maintenance problems.”

The Dart engine, over its many years of operations, became indeed refined to the point that it offered an industry standard of excellence and dependability.

Trans Canada Airlines Flight Attendant Training on Vickers Viscounts 1950s film on JetFlix TV

Trans Canada Airlines Flight Attendant Training on Vickers Viscounts 1950s film on JetFlix TV

The development was exemplified by the growth of the overhaul life of the engine. In 1958, it was overhauled every 2,000 hours. In 1968, the time between its overhauls was 9.000 hours. The Dart’s reliability allowed the 51 Viscounts of Air Canada to fly a total of 1,422,595 hours over the years of service. That figure represents approximately 392,636,220 statute miles.

The Viscount had several seating configurations in the 1950s during the early years of service with TCA. Some were all first class, seating 44 persons. But in recent years, the Viscount was configured to seat 48 passengers in an all Economy configuration.

That was only a handful more than the 40-passenger North Star offered. But the difference between the two aircraft was more evident in other fields. The Viscount was much smaller in size, but was a faster aircraft with a cruising speed of 315 mph.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount CF-THC seen from the observation deck at a very Montreal Dorval in July of 1971, the photo being taken by Tom Kucherich.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount CF-THC seen from the observation deck at a very Montreal Dorval in July of 1971, the photo being taken by Tom Kucherich.

Good and useful as it was, however, the Vickers Viscount could not avoid becoming an obsolescent aircraft. And just as it had replaced the Canadair North Star and the DC-3s of another era, it had to give way in turn to more modern and sophisticated equipment: the McDonnell-Douglas DC-9. The airline has 53 of the pure jet DC-9s which have now taken the Viscounts’ place as Air Canada’s largest fleet of a single type of aircraft. Air Canada’s fleet of Viscounts was gradually reduced in size throughout the years, until there remained only the 24 airplanes recently acquired by the two Montreal second hand aircraft brokerage firms.

Some of the previous Viscounts were retired and sold, others were “cannibalized” their parts being used for the upkeep of the existing fleet, while other parts were donated to aircraft maintenance training schools across Canada.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount CF-THL seen from the observation deck at Montreal Dorval in September of 1973, just a year before the Air Canada Viscount fleet was retired.

Air Canada Vickers Viscount CF-THL seen from the observation deck at Montreal Dorval in September of 1973, just a year before the Air Canada Viscount fleet was retired.

Among the purchasers were the Canadian Ministry of Transport. William C. Wold of New York, Canadian Schenley, Transair of Winnipeg, and United Aircraft of Montreal, which is using a former Air Canada Viscount as a test bed for development of a PT6A-50 engine. In future years, the Vickers Viscount is sure to be remembered with great fondness by Canadian air travellers for being a reliable, comfortable and safe aircraft that was an airline workhorse from coast to coast after her illustrious service with Air Canada.

TCA Viscount CF-THR at BOS on 12-22-63, David W Lucabugh photographer. This was Air Transport Photography slide nr V700559 from Clint Groves ATP collection.

TCA Viscount CF-THR at BOS on 12-22-63, David W Lucabugh photographer. This was Air Transport Photography slide nr V700559 from Clint Groves ATP collection.

TCA Viscount CF-THM gear up landing at Montreal Dorval 1961.

TCA Viscount CF-THM gear up landing at Montreal Dorval 1961.

TCA Viscount CF-THM on finals over Montreal April 1963. Slide taken by Dr. John Hatton.

TCA Viscount CF-THM on finals over Montreal April 1963. Slide taken by Dr. John Hatton.

TCA Viscount looking brand new at Toronto Malton, 1956. No other information is known about this beautiful kodachrome slide.

TCA Viscount looking brand new at Toronto Malton, 1956. No other information is known about this beautiful kodachrome slide.

TCA Vickers Viscount CF-TGR at Halifax July 1958.

TCA Vickers Viscount CF-TGR at Halifax July 1958.

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/air-canada-retires-the-vickers-viscount-april-27-1974-end-of-an-era/feed/ 0
Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019 – Pretty Much the World’s Largest Airline Collectibles Show https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-fair-2019-pretty-much-the-worlds-largest-airline-collectibles-show/ https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-fair-2019-pretty-much-the-worlds-largest-airline-collectibles-show/#comments Sat, 09 Mar 2019 00:29:02 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5790

CLICK HERE for travel agent display models report from Amsterdam 2019 show

For more information about the Amsterdam Aviation Fair please visit their website at www.aviationfair.com

(Please see bottom of page for 17 minute full version of the above show video)
I had the opportunity to attend the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair, this being their second annual airline collectibles show. The venue was the Van der Valk Hotel Schiphol A4, which is easily reached by the regular free hotel shuttle from the airport. The one day show is open to the public between 10 am and 5 pm, and this year the show featured an amazing 270+ tables with nearly 1500 people in attendance, with hard-core collectors and attendees coming from all over Europe, Turkey, Canada, the US and Japan.

In some 30 years of attending such shows, I can honestly say this was perhaps the best and biggest airline show I have ever attended. Certainly in the past 20 years. I overhead attendees saying “this show is like these shows were in the 1980s and 1990s” before the internet and online auction website caused the decline of such shows with much trader activity moving to online platforms like ebay. A lot of people missed the golden age of these shows, and it is so refreshing to attend a show like this in 2019 and to see such a high level of enthusiasm and excitement for airline collectibles.

Unlike the shows I have attended in the US post 2000, where most of the attendees are the show table holders, this was absolutely not the case at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair. I am not privy as to the foot traffic generated by US/Canadian shows, but it does not seem like they are able to generate this level of foot traffic in this day and age. Specially when North American shows are held at smaller cities that do not have a massive historical aviation/airline presence like Miami, New York, Los Angeles and Seattle.

The Amsterdam show has pretty much eclipsed every show on the planet except perhaps the US Airliners Inernational annual event. The reason for this could be the central location of Amsterdam and ease of reach by collectors all over the Europe. Another contributing factor in the show’s rapid success, has to be the massive floor space offered for the venue by the Van der Valk Hotel. It is not easy to find such a central and easily reachable hotel with such a large convention space to host upwards of 300 tables and 1500 attendees (including table holders).

It goes without says that the organizing committee for the Amsterdam Aviation Fair puts a lot of time and effort into planning and promoting their show, which happens on a year round basis. Without their amazing efforts this level if rapid success could not be achieved.

As with all shows, all sorts of airline collectibles imaginable are offered for sale at the show. But for travel agent model collectors the show for some reason attracts a massive selection of lovely models for sale, which you simply do not see at any other show at this level. So for that reason alone, I will make all efforts to attend this show in coming years.

For more information about the Amsterdam Aviation Fair please visit their website at www.aviationfair.com

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-fair-2019-pretty-much-the-worlds-largest-airline-collectibles-show/feed/ 0
Amsterdam Aviation Fair – Pure Heaven for Airline Display Model Collectors https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-fair-pure-heaven-for-airline-display-model-collectors/ https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-fair-pure-heaven-for-airline-display-model-collectors/#comments Fri, 08 Mar 2019 20:41:52 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5777

CLICK HERE for full report from Amsterdam 2019 show

For show information please visit the Amsterdam Aviation Fair website at www.aviationfair.com

The second annual Amsterdam Aviation Fair took place at the Van der Valk Hotel Schiphol A4 on Sunday, February 24, 2019. For collectors of travel agent models and aircraft display models, this was an amazing show. I have been attending airline collectibles shows for the past 30 years, and collecting display models for just a s long, and can honestly say this show was the best show I have ever attended for models.

Model collectors congregated at the show from the US, Canada, Netherlands, Germany, France and other countries and there were table holders with models for sale of course from the Netherlands, as well as Germany, and France. For collectors of Verkuyl models, given that Matthias Verkuyl was based in Badhoevedorp where he produced his fine models from the 1950s to the 1990s, it only made sense that there was a large number of Verkuyl models for sale at this show.

Two notable collections of display models were recently brought to market after the collectors had released their collection due to old age, and the presence of these two collections at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019 made this a special once-in-a-lifetime buying opportunity for model collectors. The reason being that many of the offered display models were old and rare, and they are not models that present themselves for purchase on a frequent basis.

My videos and photos below give a very good idea of the models that were offered for sale at the show. My suggestion for fellow collectors is to make plans to attend the next year’s Amsterdam Aviation Fair so as not to miss out on getting some really amazing models for your collection. You really do need to make the effort to attend the show because almost all of the display model sellers are only selling their models privately in person-to-person dealings at the show as they do not sell their models online via websites or auction sites like ebay.

If you see models you are interested in, make the effort and attend the next year show. You can get all the latest up to date information about the Amsterdam Aviation Fair by visiting their website www.aviationfair.com

Amazing period 1950s wooden ID model of a Bristol Freighter refinished into Aeropostal Venezuela colours. A really accurate and mazing model.

Amazing period 1950s wooden ID model of a Bristol Freighter refinished into Aeropostal Venezuela colours. A really accurate and mazing model.

Side profile view: Amazing period 1950s wooden ID model of a Bristol Freighter refinished into Aeropostal Venezuela colours. A really accurate and mazing model.

Side profile view: Amazing period 1950s wooden ID model of a Bristol Freighter refinished into Aeropostal Venezuela colours. A really accurate and mazing model.

This is a very nice 1990s era Lufthansa DC-3 that was made by Verkuyl for the collectors market.

This is a very nice 1990s era Lufthansa DC-3 that was made by Verkuyl for the collectors market.

This is believed to be a wooden ID model of a C-119 that was possibly refinished by Verkuyl into Syrian Arab Airlines livery. It sits on a Verkuyl base.

This is believed to be a wooden ID model of a C-119 that was possibly refinished by Verkuyl into Syrian Arab Airlines livery. It sits on a Verkuyl base.

A lovely 1950s era Walker Westway 1/72 scale South African Airways Vickers Viscount 800 metal travel agent model. In very nice condition for its age.

A lovely 1950s era Walker Westway 1/72 scale South African Airways Vickers Viscount 800 metal travel agent model. In very nice condition for its age.

Top view, this is a very nice 1990s era Lufthansa DC-3 that was made by Verkuyl for the collectors market.

Top view, this is a very nice 1990s era Lufthansa DC-3 that was made by Verkuyl for the collectors market.

Nice top view of what is believed to be a wooden ID model of a C-119 that was possibly refinished by Verkuyl into Syrian Arab Airlines livery. It sits on a Verkuyl base.

Nice top view of what is believed to be a wooden ID model of a C-119 that was possibly refinished by Verkuyl into Syrian Arab Airlines livery. It sits on a Verkuyl base.

Selection of vintage models for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair. With exception to the DC-8 and Convair these are all wooden models.

Selection of vintage models for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair. With exception to the DC-8 and Convair these are all wooden models.

The star of the show! This is an original 1950s era KLM Flying Dutchman Lockheed Super Constellation model made by Raise Up. Period models with tip tanks on the Connie makes this a particularly collectible model for collectors.

The star of the show! This is an original 1950s era KLM Flying Dutchman Lockheed Super Constellation model made by Raise Up. Period models with tip tanks on the Connie makes this a particularly collectible model for collectors.

A 1/72 scale Beech 18 and Focke Wolfe 200 both believed to be refinished metal ID models

A 1/72 scale Beech 18 and Focke Wolfe 200 both believed to be refinished metal ID models

Close up view of the wooden ID models of Pan American flying boat and Aeropostal Bristol Freighter.

Close up view of the wooden ID models of Pan American flying boat and Aeropostal Bristol Freighter.

Big Raise Up KLM 1/50 DC-8 at top, with Verkulyl Martinair DC-8 1/100 in metal, a 1/50 Martinair Convair 640 in resin and an assortment of refinished wooden ID models, all offered for sale at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019.

Big Raise Up KLM 1/50 DC-8 at top, with Verkulyl Martinair DC-8 1/100 in metal, a 1/50 Martinair Convair 640 in resin and an assortment of refinished wooden ID models, all offered for sale at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019.

At the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019 there was a large selection of Verkuyl Fokker house livery models. The Verkuyl Fokker models in factory liveries are miuch more valuable than the house livery models, of which there must have been thousands produced in the 1960s and 1970s.

At the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019 there was a large selection of Verkuyl Fokker house livery models. The Verkuyl Fokker models in factory liveries are miuch more valuable than the house livery models, of which there must have been thousands produced in the 1960s and 1970s.

In the 1980s and early 1990s, Matthias Verkuyl produced a range of 1/72 classic propliners in metal. Two examples are these 1/72 Stratocruisers in Northwest and United liveries, each bring priced in the 1200 Euro range.

In the 1980s and early 1990s, Matthias Verkuyl produced a range of 1/72 classic propliners in metal. Two examples are these 1/72 Stratocruisers in Northwest and United liveries, each bring priced in the 1200 Euro range.

In the 1980s and early 1990s, Matthias Verkuyl produced a range of 1/72 classic propliners in metal. This Braniff International Airways Lockheed 749 Connie in 1/72 scale is one such example, priced at 1200 Euros.

In the 1980s and early 1990s, Matthias Verkuyl produced a range of 1/72 classic propliners in metal. This Braniff International Airways Lockheed 749 Connie in 1/72 scale is one such example, priced at 1200 Euros.

This is an original 1950s era Lockheed L749 Connie in period BOAC livery. I believe this model is in 1/100 scale and it appears to be mounted on its original period stand. Not sure of the maker, the price is 850 Euros.

This is an original 1950s era Lockheed L749 Connie in period BOAC livery. I believe this model is in 1/100 scale and it appears to be mounted on its original period stand. Not sure of the maker, the price is 850 Euros.

This fabulous photo presents many of the wonderful models from a collector who recently exited the hobby due to old age, and his collection was presented for sale at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019.

This fabulous photo presents many of the wonderful models from a collector who recently exited the hobby due to old age, and his collection was presented for sale at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019.

This appears to be a 1/100 Raise Up QANTAS Lockheed Super Connie on a replacement stand, being offered at 1100 Euros at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

This appears to be a 1/100 Raise Up QANTAS Lockheed Super Connie on a replacement stand, being offered at 1100 Euros at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

In the background is a Verkuyl 1/72 metal National Lockheed Super Connie (at 1150 Euros). In the foreground is a small scale metal Air France Deux Ponts, most likely a refinished ID model.

In the background is a Verkuyl 1/72 metal National Lockheed Super Connie (at 1150 Euros). In the foreground is a small scale metal Air France Deux Ponts, most likely a refinished ID model.

Another view of the wonderful models from a collector who recently exited the hobby due to old age, and his collection was presented for sale at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019.

Another view of the wonderful models from a collector who recently exited the hobby due to old age, and his collection was presented for sale at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019.

Some modern and lowered priced travel agent display models offered for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Some modern and lowered priced travel agent display models offered for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

These models are offered for sale from a long established collector of many decades who recently offered his collection for sale due to old age. Many of these models are military ID models and vintage oldies models that are the types of models you see for sale only once in a lifetime.

These models are offered for sale from a long established collector of many decades who recently offered his collection for sale due to old age. Many of these models are military ID models and vintage oldies models that are the types of models you see for sale only once in a lifetime.

The 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair also featured sellers offering old toys and tin plate models or airliners for sale.

The 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair also featured sellers offering old toys and tin plate models or airliners for sale.

The large scale Fokker 100 cutaway model is a highlight piece on the table of Patrick van Rooijen, the Managing Organizer of the Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

The large scale Fokker 100 cutaway model is a highlight piece on the table of Patrick van Rooijen, the Managing Organizer of the Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Another view of the large scale Fokker 100 cutaway model from the late 1980s or early 1990s that was the highlight piece on the table of Patrick van Rooijen, the Managing Organizer of the Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Another view of the large scale Fokker 100 cutaway model from the late 1980s or early 1990s that was the highlight piece on the table of Patrick van Rooijen, the Managing Organizer of the Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

These models were for sale on the tables of Patrick van Rooijen, the Managing Organizer of the Amsterdam Aviation Fair. He sold the large Air Canada DC-8-63, and the 1/50 scale Uzbekistan IL-76.

These models were for sale on the tables of Patrick van Rooijen, the Managing Organizer of the Amsterdam Aviation Fair. He sold the large Air Canada DC-8-63, and the 1/50 scale Uzbekistan IL-76.

Another different view of the larger models that were for sale on the tables of Patrick van Rooijen, the Managing Organizer of the Amsterdam Aviation Fair. He sold the large Air Canada DC-8-63, Martinair DC-10, and the 1/50 scale Uzbekistan IL-76.

Another different view of the larger models that were for sale on the tables of Patrick van Rooijen, the Managing Organizer of the Amsterdam Aviation Fair. He sold the large Air Canada DC-8-63, Martinair DC-10, and the 1/50 scale Uzbekistan IL-76.

This is a unique model of a 1920/30s era Lufthansa Junkers. Although the mixture of modern and vintage liveries is questionable. The model measures about 30 X 30 cm and appears to be of vintage manufacture, possibly hand built. It is certainly is an accurate model and classifies as being unique, as this will likely be the one and only such model like this a collector is likely to see in an entire lifetime of collecting.

This is a unique model of a 1920/30s era Lufthansa Junkers. Although the mixture of modern and vintage liveries is questionable. The model measures about 30 X 30 cm and appears to be of vintage manufacture, possibly hand built. It is certainly is an accurate model and classifies as being unique, as this will likely be the one and only such model like this a collector is likely to see in an entire lifetime of collecting.

Another view from one of the surplus collections of vintage civil and military ID and display models, as offered for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Another view from one of the surplus collections of vintage civil and military ID and display models, as offered for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Another selection of budget priced value models from the modern era offered for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair. These entry level models are ideal for new collectors entering the hobby.

Another selection of budget priced value models from the modern era offered for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair. These entry level models are ideal for new collectors entering the hobby.

Another selection of budget priced value models from the modern era offered for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair. These entry level models are ideal for new collectors entering the hobby.

Another selection of budget priced value models from the modern era offered for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair. These entry level models are ideal for new collectors entering the hobby.

1950s on top, 1960s and 1970s down below. A nice selection of many Verkuyl models highlight this photo of models offered for sale a the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

1950s on top, 1960s and 1970s down below. A nice selection of many Verkuyl models highlight this photo of models offered for sale a the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

1950s on top, 1960s and 1970s down below. A nice selection of many Verkuyl models highlight this photo of models offered for sale a the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

A nice 1/50 fibreglass TAP Portugal 727-100 travel agent model for sale at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019.

A nice 1/50 fibreglass TAP Portugal 727-100 travel agent model for sale at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019.

Once-in-a-lifetime modes. This amazing collection of refinished ID models (metal and wood) are from a long term collector who recently released his collection to the marketplace. They were all offered for sale at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019.

Once-in-a-lifetime modes. This amazing collection of refinished ID models (metal and wood) are from a long term collector who recently released his collection to the marketplace. They were all offered for sale at the Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2019.

This is the table of models for sale of display model collector David Bourgaud from Paris, as presented at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

This is the table of models for sale of display model collector David Bourgaud from Paris, as presented at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Some more modern models offered for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Some more modern models offered for sale at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

For the corporate model collector, a table with an interesting selection including three Mu-2s.

For the corporate model collector, a table with an interesting selection including three Mu-2s.

Fokker house models by IMC and Verkuyl were in good supply at fair prices at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Fokker house models by IMC and Verkuyl were in good supply at fair prices at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Some vintage Mystere metal models from the 1950s at 150 Euros per model, at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Some vintage Mystere metal models from the 1950s at 150 Euros per model, at the 2019 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-fair-pure-heaven-for-airline-display-model-collectors/feed/ 0
Izmir Adnan Menderes International Airport spotting from VIP Departures Lounge https://www.henrytenby.com/izmir-adnan-menderes-international-airport-spotting-from-vip-departures-lounge/ https://www.henrytenby.com/izmir-adnan-menderes-international-airport-spotting-from-vip-departures-lounge/#comments Sun, 03 Mar 2019 20:59:32 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5728 Henry Tenby enjoys a visit to the VIP lounge at Izmir Adnan Menderes International Airport.

Henry Tenby enjoys a visit to the VIP lounge at Izmir Adnan Menderes International Airport.

On September 18, 2018, I enjoyed a few hours in the VIP lounge on the departures gate level (airside) at Izmir’s Adnan Menderes International Airport prior to our flight back to Istanbul. We had been in Cesme for a short rest and relaxation break, which included a visit to the amazing ancient city of Ephesus. It was a lovely visit, the weather was beautiful, and I look forward to enjoying many more such visits in the future.

As a Priority Pass member, this gives me lounge access whenever I travel. So this was my first visit through Izmir airport, save for our arrival several days prior, when we were keen to pick up our rental vehicle for the drive to Cesme. We arrived at Izmir airport about three or four hours early to leave good buffer time before our flight to Istanbul, which gave us a leisure visit to the Izmir VIP lounge.

As shown in the photos below, the lounge is all glass and provides a fabulous view of the apron below, which is perfect for aircraft spotters and photographers. Although the traffic is pretty monotonous with repeating Turkish domestic carriers during the course of our visit. The food at the lounge included a standard variety of drinks and coffees, as well as the standard Turkish food staples including cheeses, olives, and light snacks.

Lounge at Izmir airport offers a nice view of the entire apron.

img_2706.jpg

img_2685.jpg

img_2686.jpg

img_2684.jpg

img_2701.jpg

img_2704.jpg

img_2698.jpg

Departures gates at Izmir Airport

All the major Turkish based airlines have flights from Izmir airport.

img_2318.jpg

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/izmir-adnan-menderes-international-airport-spotting-from-vip-departures-lounge/feed/ 0
The Vanguard Passes Into History https://www.henrytenby.com/the-vanguard-passes-into-history/ https://www.henrytenby.com/the-vanguard-passes-into-history/#comments Fri, 01 Mar 2019 00:16:52 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5653 FLASHBACK 1971: AIR CANADA CAPTAIN J. R. DESMARIAS, WHO HAS 1,000 HOURS ON VANGUARDS, MOURNS THE PASSING OF THIS BEAUTIFUL BIRD

Air Canada Vanguard last flight October 31 1971

CLICK HERE to read about the Air Canada Viscount Last Flight

It was 0134 hours, Sunday, October 31, 1971. At Montreal International Airport, the brightly lit ramp was quiet. Because of the 11 pm curfew, the jets had stopped operating. The flashing beacons of the ramp trucks had disappeared one by one. Beyond the terminal building, the blue taxiway lights added to the stillness.

From their vantage point in the tower, the controllers could see a red rotating light moving slowly across the horizon, joining a long final for runway 06R.

“Montreal Tower, Air Canada 2458, we’re cleared for a visual approach.” That was Capt. S. F. Davis handling the radio; F/O Lorne Dyck was flying the airplane.

In the back were 16 passengers, including Kent Davis, Air Canada’s Vice-President of flight operations, and Capt. Bill Benson, Director of Flight Standards.

“Air Canada 2458, Montreal Tower. You’re cleared to land. Wind 060 at 12, altimeter 30.31.”

“Air Canada 2458.”

CF-TKB (725) Nice taxying shot at the Farnborough Air Show back in 1960.

CF-TKB (725) Nice taxying shot at the Farnborough Air Show back in 1960.

The flashing red light continued toward the runway as F/O Dyck descended tenderly. Suddenly the threshold was illuminated by three bright landing lights, and F/O Dyck set the airplane down without a ripple at 0139. As the airplane approached the terminal area, it first became a silhouette and then the unmistakable box-like shape of a Vickers Vanguard. The big prop-jet taxied to gate 43 and shut down. Thus, routinely and unceremoniously, 2458 marked the end of passenger service on the Vanguard, that rugged, magnificent aircraft that had served Trans-Canada Air Lines and then Air Canada for more than 10 years.

One who may have felt the end more than most was Capt. Benson. It was exactly 11 years ago on that night that he flew to England to begin his training on the Vanguard.

Selection of the Vanguard by TCA came after one of the most exhaustive studies of aircraft operating economics ever completed in the industry. The Vickers Vanguard was matched against all other potential medium—range airplanes, flying and projected, pure jet and turbo-propeller, before it was selected. Over TCA’s routes, which not only had to be averaged but factored to account for traffic density, the Vanguard came first. But many other factors, some not easily calculated came into the picture.

Some people in TCA were all for going pure jet; when the DC-9 came second in the economics study, this was all they wanted to know. But the ‘9’ was then a ‘paper’ airplane, Douglas Aircraft awaiting solid commitments before proceeding. Should the airplane be built, it would be out two years later than the Vanguard, putting TCA at a competitive disadvantage for that period.

CF-TKB (293) fresh from the factory at Weybridge prior to delivery to Canada. In this instance the people do not detract from the photo.

CF-TKB (293) fresh from the factory at Weybridge prior to delivery to Canada. In this instance the people do not detract from the photo.

(The project DC-9 was a different airplane from what was eventually produced. Range was to be 2.600 miles, definitely ‘medium’. The Boeing 727 filled that area and the ‘9’ as we know it was introduced in airline service as a ‘medium-short’ airplane in 1965.)

Also, the Vanguard had a cargo hold volume that no other passenger airplane could offer and freight projections indicated a needed capacity in that area as well. Still, the jet people had good arguments: definitely superior passenger appeal, longer projected life and, in the case of the DC-9, certain parts interchangeability with the DC-8, offering additional economics.

The Vanguard won out, however. On January 3, 1957, TCA announced the purchase of 20 Vanguards for a sum of $67.1 million. Eventually, three more were obtained, making TCA the world’s largest Vanguard Operator.

The first flight of the Vanguard took place on January 20, 1959 and the first TCA airplane began flying on July 9, 1960. In the July 22 issue, Aero Magazine reported the start of trials of the TCA Vanguard and, buried obscurer in the article, a small note to the effect that one of the differences between the TCA and British European Airways Vanguards was the fact that TCA had specified Skydrol 500A hydraulic fluid. Oh. How large that difference was going to be.

An unidentified Trans-Canada Air Lines Vanguard gets airborne from Vickers Weybridge, Surrey during an early test flight.

An unidentified Trans-Canada Air Lines Vanguard gets airborne from Vickers Weybridge, Surrey during an early test flight.

On Halloween 1960, five TCA pilots proceeded to Weybridge, England for the Vanguard course. They were Capt. George Lothian, then Superintendent of Flying, Capt. Ron Baker, TCA’s engineering test pilot, and Captains Bill Benson, Ed Marriott and Al Wilton, who were to be the initial instructors on the Vanguard and later check pilots.

After ground school. Captain Baker pursued a course befitting his capacity while the other four captains were paired in two groups for the flight training. The Vickers instructors were Dick Rymer, who was later killed in the BAC-III deep—stall accident, and Denis Hailey-Bell.

Vanguard had already developed teething problems, one of them being the failure of cabin compressors. While Vickers and Rolls—Royce were working on modifications, training carried on without pressurization or cabin temperature control, in the dead of winter.

Another problem evident at that stage was the presence of nose-wheel shimmies. Although they were found not to affect the integrity of the structure, the severity of the shimmies was as pronounced as it was unpredictable. Ron Baker got into the act; he went up with Dick Rymer and Bill Benson and they tried every possible way of landing to bring on the shimmy, unsuccessfully. After eighteen attempts, they decided to quit. Benson said: “Let’s try it once more.” On the nineteenth try, the airplane behaved as if it had landed on top of railroad ties.

Trans-Canada Air Lines Vickers Vanguard CF-TKB being put through the paces at the Farnborough airshow, 1960 or 1961.

Trans-Canada Air Lines Vickers Vanguard CF-TKB being put through the paces at the Farnborough airshow, 1960 or 1961.

This problem, like many others typical of development flying, sent the engineers back to the drawing board and improvements were eventually made.

George Lothian and Al Wilton flew the first aircraft to Canada and the flight training program for the line pilots started. The Vanguard simulator was already installed and proved to be an excellent one. In addition to duplicating all systems, the Vanguard ‘box’ incorporated sound simulation. Engine noise, rush of air as in a rapid decompression, whine of an over-speeding propeller, even the tire squeal on landing. Once, during a simulator exercise, the instructor failed all four engines to see what the pilots would do.

They were “flying” at six thousand feet and their initial reaction was one of staring disbelief. The two pilots looked at each other for confirmation of reality then, questioningly, at the instructor sitting behind them. They were losing altitude, and fast: “Is this a power failure, like I mean, Quebec Hydro?” asked the pilot in the left seat. “No, it’s a power failure, like I mean, your engines!” answered the instructor. The pilots swiftly initiated the air-start procedure. With one going and one windmilling, the ‘aircraft’ was going in at a 30° angle. In desperation, the pilot in the right seat selected gear down. When they ‘hit’, the simulator fastidiously gave them the ‘screech-screech’ of the wheels.

The inaugural flight took place February 1, 1961, and was flown by Capt. Benson and Captains Dave Moir of Vancouver and Jack Smith of Toronto. The route was Montreal – Toronto – Winnipeg – Regina – Calgary – Vancouver. During the station stop in Winnipeg, it was discovered that the fire warning bell test circuit was un-serviceable. To ensure that the bell would work in case of an actual fire, the fire wire in each engine was grounded in turn by maintenance, the bell ringing in the cockpit each time. At the next stop, Regina, the procedure was repeated. Again in Calgary. But this time five bells were heard. Jack Smith, who carried an alarm clock in his bag, had set the thing to go off!

Trans-Canada Airlines Vanguard CF-TKN in a truly mouthwatering shot for the unabashed Vickers Vanguard fanatic. Obviously this 35mm kodachrome colour slide was taken on board a sister ship, with engines running. We can soak up the atmosphere of the then brand new Toronto Malton Terminal 1 with Trans-Canada Vanguard CF-TKN at the gate awaiting her passengers. Oh my lord ... What a superb shot.

Trans-Canada Airlines Vanguard CF-TKN in a truly mouthwatering shot for the unabashed Vickers Vanguard fanatic. Obviously this 35mm kodachrome colour slide was taken on board a sister ship, with engines running. We can soak up the atmosphere of the then brand new Toronto Malton Terminal 1 with Trans-Canada Vanguard CF-TKN at the gate awaiting her passengers. Oh my lord … What a superb shot!

The early days of the Vanguard were beset by problems. One was vibration, with a resulting high noise level. By coincidence, it turned out that the fuselage length and the position and RPM of the props set up a natural vibration, which would slowly be transmitted through the fuselage all the way to the tail . . . and forth . . . and back . . . The Vanguard was a perfect tuning fork!

In concert with BEA and TCA, Vickers tackled the problem and a temporary procedure involved climbing with 5° flap. Later. Mainly through the addition of weights to the tailplane, the problem was solved, but not to everyone’s satisfaction. Already spoiled by jets, people expected the same of the Vanguard, something a turbo-prop is simply unable to deliver.

Canada Airline Industry 1960s Coast to Coast movie on JetFlix TVChoosing the new Skydrol 500A for hydraulic fluid was wise; it was super stuff. The fact that the seals were eaten away by it was another matter. Hydraulic problems were chronic. As one passenger stated, “When they can’t get the heels down, I get nervous; in that airplane, they couldn’t get them UP!” Well, sometimes. Actually, it took a sizeable loss of fluid before services would no longer operate. Other aircraft would be taxiing behind a Vanguard and advise that it was dripping hydraulic fluid; “We know, we know,” would be the reply.

That problem was solved by the replacement of seals and other difficulties were being surmounted as well. Schedule reliability increased gradually so that by November, 1961, on-time performance had reached 71 per cent compared to 41 per cent two months previously.

That winter, the Vanguard was introduced to the South. Still unsatisfied with the aircraft’s reliability, TCA wanted a back—up for what was to be the Vanguard’s premier run. It was decided to stand a Lockheed Super Constellation next to the Vanguard on the ramp so that if the latter packed up at the last minute, the passengers would be transferred to the waiting Constellation. Since Toronto did not have ‘Connie’ crews, a Montreal crew would stay at a motel close to the airport, ready to lend support. If the Vanguard worked, they would return to the motel. After a few days they would go back to Montreal and be relieved by another crew. Sometimes they got to fly, most often not. That operation came to be known as the ‘Conguard’!

Dave Tennant is now Air Canada’s Vice-president — Personnel but was formerly Vice-president — Operations and had a hand in choosing the Vanguard for TCA. He said: “The Vanguard was the best for the mission; when we looked at the cost projections, it was a winner. The belly compartment with its great cargo capacity just added to that.”

The Vanguard was a newer airplane than the first generation of jets but the prestige was stolen by the Douglas DC-8 which TCA had introduced in Canada ten months earlier. Not only was the jet smoother and quieter but the ‘8’ was glamorous.

When Trans-Canada Air Lines was renamed Air Canada in 1965, all the types were taken up for a new round of air-to-air publicity shots, which was the occasion for this lovely image, originally from Air Canada archives. This photo of CF-TKP is actually a photo teaser from my book

When Trans-Canada Air Lines was renamed Air Canada in 1965, all the types were taken up for a new round of air-to-air publicity shots, which was the occasion for this lovely image, originally from Air Canada archives. This photo of CF-TKP is actually a photo teaser from my book “Air-To-Air: Ultimate Airline Photography” which showcases 175 all-colour pages of classic propliners and classic jetliners photographed inflight. You can purchase your own copy of my book right here: https://www.henrytenby.com/product/air-to-air-ultimate-airline-photography-by-henry-tenby/.

People were spoiled: they did not realize that the jet was still basically a long-range airplane. At the time that the Vanguard was introduced, two medium-range pure jets were flying, the Convair 880 and the British-built De Havilland Comet 4.

Neither presented anywhere near the passenger seat cost economics of the Vanguard over the routes flown by TCA and their purchase would have resulted in higher fares with little decrease in block times. Both being very thirsty aircraft. It was somehow forgotten that most of the world’s medium-range routes were still being flown by pistons.

Above the Clouds TCA Air Canada Air-to-Air Symphony 1940s-1970s – Now on JetFlix TVIn the Vanguard, the value dollar for dollar, was unsurpassed. The Vanguard offered the best travel bargain. The Economy cabin had larger seats and was superior to that of any short/medium-haul aircraft then flying. The first-class section was magnificent. Isolated at the rear, the quiet little club remains in the eyes of many a unique travel experience. And Vanguard’s over-sized oval windows (like the smaller Viscount) provided passengers with unparalleled views.

The safety record of the Vanguard is exceptional.

The aircraft was introduced in service with perhaps a larger than usual share of teething problems yet it progressed through the ‘learning curve’ without a major accident. The later fatal crash of a BEA Vanguard at Heathrow, England was attributed to pilot error and in Air Canada service a lone fatality resulted from a passenger being killed when a flight unexpectedly encountered severe clear air turbulence over Rocky Mountain House. Alta. In a landing accident at Antigua and in a wheels-up landing at Montreal, no one was injured. It can be said that the Vanguard, of itself, has never as much as scratched anyone. (At the time of writing, the tragic BEA Vanguard accident in Belgium was still under investigation.)

Yet another nice profile view of Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKP during her air-to-air company name rebrand publicity shots back in 1965, from Air Canada archives.

Yet another nice profile view of Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKP during her air-to-air company name rebrand publicity shots back in 1965, from Air Canada archives.

Of the wheels-up landing in Montreal following a hydraulic failure, certain anecdotes are worthy of mention: Captain Ed Marriott, in command of the flight, was in communication with TCA via the company frequency. Since this was the first year of Vanguard operation, everyone was not only concerned but also a bit in the dark as to why the landing gear would not, at least, free-fall. Through a communications set-up, Capt. Marriott was put in direct contact with a Vickers engineer at home in bed in Weybridge, England!

Aware that they would circle for quite a while, Capt. Marriott authorized the serving of drinks to the passengers. The stewardess advised that she had sealed the bar when ‘in range’ of Montreal, as per company regulations. “Well, open it again,” directed Capt. Marriott. This she did, by bashing it open with the fire axe! Air Canada has always been a market leader in terms of the highest levels of passenger service.

The hydraulic off-load switch was once a problem. When the switch was in the ‘off’ position, the system was ‘on-loaded’ (pressurized), and vice-versa. Well, think about it: if the off-load switch is off, then you’re on-loaded, right? Of course, perfectly logical. But try to teach it in the class- room. TCA finally changed it to be more in tune with the Canadian mind and linguistics; when the switch said ‘on’, you were ‘ON’. Don’t think, baby, just fly the plane!

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKG looks amazing sitting on the Montreal Dorval apron back in 1967.This Vanguard was sold to Air Holdings Limited as G-AYLD in 1969, as part of a trade-in deal with Lockheed towards new L-1011s. Lockheed re-sold the Air Canada Vanguards to Air Holdings for onward disposal. I don't like the word

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKG looks amazing sitting on the Montreal Dorval apron back in 1967.This Vanguard was sold to Air Holdings Limited as G-AYLD in 1969, as part of a trade-in deal with Lockheed towards new L-1011s. Lockheed re-sold the Air Canada Vanguards to Air Holdings for onward disposal. I don’t like the word “disposal” when applied to Vickers Vanguards.

Another dandy was the ‘Chime Isolate’. The Vanguard galley control panel incorporated a number of switches for diverse services and these were indicated above each switch. One such switch was marked ‘Chime’; just under the word ‘chime’ was ‘Isolate’ for turning it off and below the switch was printed ‘on’ for, naturally, having the thing on. A lot of stewardesses read that as the ‘Chime Isolate’ so that if it was selected ‘on’ the chime would be isolated. They therefore moved the switch to the other position, in effect turning it off

Air Canada Vanguard and DC-8 streaming on JetFlix TVIn the cockpit, pilots would hit the call button with ever-increasing frenzy, wishing for a cup of coffee. At the end of the flight, the pilots would say to the ‘stew’: “We called you a hundred times, where were you?” And the ‘stew’ would answer: “I never heard the chime; I guess it doesn’t work.” The pilots would then write in the maintenance log book that the chime was unserviceable. Maintenance would try it, find it in perfect working order and enter in the book: ‘Ground-checked Serviceable’. They would then leave the switch in the ‘on’ position.

The next crew of stewardesses would board the aircraft, change the switch over and the whole cycle would start all over again. It took years for us stupid Canadians to figure that one out.

Yet another example of the difference between British and Candian logic and linguistics.

It is impossible to describe the propeller system. Suffice it to say that it has nine protective devices to prevent the props from going into ‘ground-fine’ in the air. Glen Cawker of Air Canada says that when the Englishman who designed the propeller was finished with it, they took him away.

What was it like to fly the Vanguard? Well, it was much more than flying a big Viscount. Bill Benson, who is now Air Canada’s Director of Flight Standards, said: “I loved the airplane; it was a great rudder airplane, it made you fly more, The Vanguard had the finest cockpit ever designed; the lighting was superb. It was simply magnificent over the lights of Montreal.”

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKH awaits passengers on the Dorval apron as viewed from the once sprawling open air observation deck at Montreal. In this case the photo was taken in 1967, and the Vanguard is carrying the small Expo 67 logo by the right sill of the rear passenger door. CF-TKH was sold to Europe Air Service in 1972 as F-BTOU.

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKH awaits passengers on the Dorval apron as viewed from the once sprawling open air observation deck at Montreal. In this case the photo was taken in 1967, and the Vanguard is carrying the small Expo 67 logo by the right sill of the rear passenger door. CF-TKH was sold to Europe Air Service in 1972 as F-BTOU.

Brian Trubshaw, who was later to test-fly the Concorde, was Chief Test Pilot on the Vanguard project. He demanded more space in the cockpit, knowing from experience that the dimensions would be cut back later. This time the boffins listened to him. The result. The Vanguard had, and still has, the most spacious flight station of any commercial airplane. As one stewardess expressed when she first set foot inside the Vanguard cockpit: “You could have a dance in here!”

“But the airplane was a great leveller,” adds Benson. “Most guys came on it from the Viscount and were used to greasing it on.” Said Capt. Gerry Lloyd, Air Canada’s Flight Operations Director, Toronto Base: “The Vanguard was a horse of a different wheelbarrow.”

And how! At the beginning, the landings were atrocious. Pilots would cross the fence, close the throttles and. . . crunch! Well, isn’t that the way we were all taught? The Vanguard, with four wide, 141/2 foot diameter props was different, all right. First, when the throttles were closed, the props went against the ‘flight fine’ stops, a relatively flat pitch; second, and partially as a result of the first, the immediate speed reduction caused the airplane to sink rapidly and contact the runway. ‘Contact’ is the key word here.

The plane had wings and it had engines; there just had to be some way of putting the two together and decently depositing the Vanguard on the runway. “No. There is no way,” said one. Said another: “Where you close the throttles, that’s where you land.”

Said yet another, despairingly: “Any landing you walk away from is a good one.” But a few were having some success and the word gradually filtered to the troops. The guys were no longer crashing them on, but the airplane remained a challenge right to the end.

Stopping distance was phenomenal. With over twice the weight of the Viscount and additional speed over the threshold, the Vanguard could be stopped shorter, even without reversing. Putting the propellers into the ‘ground’ mode after touchdown sent them to aerodynamic 0°, effectively offering the slipstream a veritable barn door. On scheduled airport runways, reverse was never used, brakes hardly. Yet, if you needed them, they were there. Tremendous security.

Passengers boarding Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKU at Montreal Dorval, June 1965. This Vanguard was sold by Air Canada to Air Holdings Limited in 1969 as G-AZNG in trade for Lockheed L-1011s.

Passengers boarding Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKU at Montreal Dorval, June 1965. This Vanguard was sold by Air Canada to Air Holdings Limited in 1969 as G-AZNG in trade for Lockheed L-1011s.

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard CF-TKH awaits passengers on the Dorval apron as viewed from the once sprawling open air observation deck at Montreal. In this case the photo was taken in 1967, and the Vanguard is carrying the small Expo 67 logo by the right sill of the rear passenger door. CF-TKH was sold to Europe Air Service in 1972 as F-BTOU

Three pilots hold the distinction of having flown every Vanguard that was ever built. They are Capt. Hans Schlieper, First Officer Ike Jones and former First Officer Doug Vann. All three were TCA pilots who flew with BEA after being laid off by the former. They later returned to their homeland and flew the Air Canada Vanguards. Capt. Schlieper, with more than a little naval tradition, expressed his feelings: “She was the last of the four-masted square riggers. I detest the thought of being a wooden man in an iron ship, with no bridge to pace.”

Capt. Lloyd Warriner, who alternately flew the line, instructed and was a check pilot on the Vanguard referred to it, and still does, as the ‘World’s Greatest Airplane’.

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard 952C CF-TKK was the only Vanguard in the fleet converted to pure freighter, as explained in the article above. And seen in this photo at Toronto Malton in August, 1970. In 1972 this Air Canada Vanguard was sold to Europe Aero Service as F-BTYB where it continued to operate through the decade of the 1970s as a Perpignon-based cargo hauler.

Air Canada Vickers Vanguard 952C CF-TKK was the only Vanguard in the fleet converted to pure freighter, as explained in the article above. And seen in this photo at Toronto Malton in August, 1970. In 1972 this Air Canada Vanguard was sold to Europe Aero Service as F-BTYB where it continued to operate through the decade of the 1970s as a Perpignon-based cargo hauler.

Perhaps no other transport aircraft imparted such an exhilarating feeling to its pilots and it appears that with automation, none ever will. Pilots loved the Vanguard with an emotion like that held for the DC-3.

If you should hear that unmistakable sound, if you should see that unique shape, you’re not dreaming; there is still one Vanguard in Canadian skies. CF-TKK. It is a freighter, Air Canada’s lone experiment at modifying the Vanguard for cargo operation. No additional aircraft will be converted as it cannot be justified economically. However, this freighter will continue in service for an indefinite period.

When they pass TKK in their faster jets, former Vanguard pilots will not look down on it. They will let their eyes languish a few seconds before returning their attention to the horizon, thinking . . . there she goes, the last of the great prop-liners.

We've saved the best Air Canada Vickers Vanguard photos for the last. In this case we are presented with the signature low deck angle departure shot of an Air Canada Vickers Vanguard from Montreal Dorval taken in March, 1965. This original slide came fro the famous Thompson slide collection.

We’ve saved the best Air Canada Vickers Vanguard photos for the last. In this case we are presented with the signature low deck angle departure shot of an Air Canada Vickers Vanguard from Montreal Dorval taken in March, 1965. This original slide came fro the famous Thompson slide collection.

The signature front office nose on shot with the lovely view of the engines and beefy props and trademark black nose Air Canada Vickers Vanguard at Toronto Malton, October 1969. The font view of a Vanguard is pure magic.

The signature front office nose on shot with the lovely view of the engines and beefy props and trademark black nose Air Canada Vickers Vanguard at Toronto Malton, October 1969. The font view of a Vanguard is pure magic!

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/the-vanguard-passes-into-history/feed/ 0
Hermeskeil Aviation Museum Germany Visit November 2018 https://www.henrytenby.com/hermeskeil-aviation-museum-germany-visit-november-2018/ https://www.henrytenby.com/hermeskeil-aviation-museum-germany-visit-november-2018/#comments Tue, 19 Feb 2019 01:58:58 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5629
Niels Dam, Andreas Stryk and Henry Tenby captured in the optimal selfie with the Lufthansa Viscount 800 as the backdrop. At the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Niels Dam, Andreas Stryk and Henry Tenby captured in the optimal selfie with the Lufthansa Viscount 800 D-ANUM as the backdrop. At the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. November, 2018.

In early November of 2018, my good friend Andreas Stryk drove me and another good friend, Niels Dam from Amsterdam by car from Frankfurt to the Hermeskeil aviation museum, which is a 2 hour road journey at a leisure driving pace. We allocated a full day trip for our museum visit from Frankfurt, as we did not want to have any stress or time pressure so we could enjoy the exhibits at the museum in a non rushed basis.

The privately owned museum features a very large outdoor collection of post war commercial airliners and military aircraft, from both Eastern and Western block manufacturers. Whilst the older aircraft, engines and historic displays are kept in the indoors building, which is not heated. Our visit of early November very much required warm outdoor clothing as it was quite cold outside and in the building.

In my opinion, the three star exhibits in this collection has to be the original Lufthansa Lockheed Super Constellation D-ALIN, the United Arab Emirates Vickers VC-10 G-ARVF, and the original early 1970s or late 1960s Concorde mock-up, which is open as a heated coffee shop and rest area to seek respite from the elements. The aircraft and helicopters from Soviet times are also very interesting, and although the museum is fairly remote, it is most certainly worth a visit for hard-core aviation tourists who find themselves within a few hour driving range of the collection.

Another nice view, this time in side profile of Lufthansa L-1049 Super Connie D-ALIN at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Another nice view, this time in side profile of Lufthansa L-1049 Super Connie D-ALIN at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Henry Tenby with the fabulous Lufthansa Lockheed Super Constellation at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Henry Tenby with the fabulous Lufthansa Lockheed Super Constellation at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

'Aint it pretty! The three fins of the Connie are pure aviation magic! Lufthansa L-1049 Super Connie D-ALIN is one of the star attractions at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

‘Aint it pretty! The three fins of the Connie are pure aviation magic! Lufthansa L-1049 Super Connie D-ALIN is one of the star attractions at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

I can't get enough of a lovely piston pounding Super Connie from every angle! 'Aint it pretty! The three fins of the Connie are pure aviation magic! Lufthansa L-1049 Super Connie D-ALIN is one of the star attractions at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

I can’t get enough of a lovely piston pounding Super Connie from every angle! ‘Aint it pretty! The three fins of the Connie are pure aviation magic! Lufthansa L-1049 Super Connie D-ALIN is one of the star attractions at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Can't get enough! Three tails are better than one! Lufthansa Lockheed Super Constellation D-ALIN at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Can’t get enough! Three tails are better than one! Lufthansa Lockheed Super Constellation D-ALIN at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

BAC Aerospacial Concorde mock-up at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

BAC Aerospacial Concorde mock-up at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Late 1960s era static moc-up of the Concorde at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Late 1960s era static moc-up of the Concorde at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Inside cabin view of the 1960s era static Concorde mock-up at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Inside cabin view of the 1960s era static Concorde mock-up at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Under wing view of the late 1960s era static moc-up of the Concorde at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. Note the structural supports to keep the heavy wing sections in place.

Under wing view of the late 1960s era static moc-up of the Concorde at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. Note the structural supports to keep the heavy wing sections in place.

Like everyone else, we stopped inside the mock-up Concorde for some warm drinks after spending several hours in the cold elements taking in the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. Left to right, Niels Dam, Andreas Stryk, and Henry Tenby.

Like everyone else, we stopped inside the mock-up Concorde for some warm drinks after spending several hours in the cold elements taking in the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. Left to right, Niels Dam, Andreas Stryk, and Henry Tenby.

Niels Dam does a ground inspection on the awesome Interflug Tupolev Tu-134 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Niels Dam does a ground inspection on the awesome Interflug Tupolev Tu-134 DDR-SCK at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Henry Tenby chillin' with the awesome Interflug Tupolev Tu-134 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Henry Tenby chillin’ with the awesome Interflug Tupolev Tu-134 DDR-SCK at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Another nice side profile view of Interflug Tupolev Tu-134 DDR-SCK at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Another nice side profile view of Interflug Tupolev Tu-134 DDR-SCK at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. This aircraft was acquired by the museum directly from Interflug, the former State airline of East Germany.

Under nose study of the Interflug Tupolev Tu-134 DDR-SCK at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Under nose study of the Interflug Tupolev Tu-134 DDR-SCK at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Henry Tenby enjoying some quality time with two feathered Rolls Royce Dart engines, of the Lufthansa Viscount 800 D-ANUM at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Henry Tenby enjoying some quality time with two feathered Rolls Royce Dart engines, of the Lufthansa Viscount 800 D-ANUM at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Under nose study of the Lufthansa Viscount 800 D-ANUM at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Under nose study of the Lufthansa Viscount 800 D-ANUM at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

A pure classic from any angle! Lufthansa Vickers Viscount 800 D-ANUM at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

A pure classic from any angle! Lufthansa Vickers Viscount 800 D-ANUM at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Front office view aboard Vickers VC-10 G-ARVF at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Front office view aboard Vickers VC-10 G-ARVF at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Rear facing VIP cabin view as seen from the front entrance door aboard Vickers VC-10 G-ARVF at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Rear facing VIP cabin view as seen from the front entrance door aboard Vickers VC-10 G-ARVF at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Vickers VC-10 G-ARVF tail view at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Vickers VC-10 G-ARVF tail view at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

United Arab Emirates Government Vickers VC-10 now permanently rests at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. It was flown to a nearby military airfield in the early 1980s, and then disassembled and moved to the museum by road, where it was put back together.

United Arab Emirates Government Vickers VC-10 now permanently rests at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. It was flown to a nearby military airfield in the early 1980s, and then disassembled and moved to the museum by road, where it was put back together.

Interflug IL-18 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Interflug IL-18 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Cabin view aboard the Interflug IL-18 DDR-STH at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Cabin view aboard the Interflug IL-18 DDR-STH at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. I’m keen for a flight!

Interflug IL-18 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Interflug IL-18 engine details at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Polish Air Force IL-14 propliner transport at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. A very "meat and potatoes" all purpose transport for all sorts of uses.

Polish Air Force IL-14 propliner transport at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. A very “meat and potatoes” all purpose transport for all sorts of uses.

Cockpit of the Polish Air Force IL-14 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Cockpit of the Polish Air Force IL-14 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Part of the furniture. A Dornier D-28 D-IFMP at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Part of the furniture. A Dornier D-28 D-IFMP at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Dan-Air London Comet 4C G-BDIW at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Dan-Air London Comet 4C G-BDIW at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Guess the engine? You should know instantly! This is the daisy petal sound suppressor from a Rolls Royce Conway engine, that powered ealry Boeing 707s, including those delivered to Lufthansa and BOAC. This engine is from a Lufthansa aircraft and is on display at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Guess the engine? You should know instantly! This is the daisy petal sound suppressor from a Rolls Royce Conway engine, that powered ealry Boeing 707s, including those delivered to Lufthansa and BOAC. This engine is from a Lufthansa aircraft and is on display at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Bell 206 D-HBZV of the Luftrettung at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Bell 206 D-HBZV of the Luftrettung at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Huge model of the Dornier DoX flying boat D-1929 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Huge model of the Dornier DoX flying boat D-1929 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Large scale pre-war flying wing aircraft model D-APIS at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Large scale pre-war flying wing aircraft model D-APIS at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Aeroflot Mil-26 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. When donated/acquired by the museum, the helicopter was flown by her Russian crews directly to the museum.

Aeroflot Mil-26 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. When donated/acquired by the museum, the helicopter was flown by her Russian crews directly to the museum.

Cubana Cuba Antonov AN-24 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Cubana Cuba Antonov AN-24 at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

USAF Cold War beauty! The Convair F-102 Delta Dart 61125, was actually based in West Germany back in the 1960s. She now is on permanent loan from the US Air Force as a display at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

USAF Cold War beauty! The Convair F-102 Delta Dart 61125, was actually based in West Germany back in the 1960s.
She now is on permanent loan from the US Air Force as a display at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Royal Navy De Havilland Dove "Devon" at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Royal Navy De Havilland Dove “Devon” at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Luftwaffe Percivil Pembroke 5421 the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. Back in the 1960s these were a dime a dozen in Germany, but the entire fleet was retired by the early 1970s.

Luftwaffe Percivil Pembroke 5421 the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany. Back in the 1960s these were a dime a dozen in Germany, but the entire fleet was retired by the early 1970s.

Isn't she a beauty? This Dan-Air London Comet 4C was acquired by the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany in the early 1980s, and she has been on guard looking smart ever since. One wonders if she could be made into a ground running breathing high-speed taxi aircraft with a bit of restoration. That would be amazing!

Isn’t she a beauty? This Dan-Air London Comet 4C was acquired by the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany in the early 1980s, and she has been on guard looking smart ever since. One wonders if she could be made into a ground running breathing high-speed taxi aircraft with a bit of restoration. That would be amazing!

EFL Nortatlas D-ACUT at the Hermeskeil Aviation Museum in Germany.

EFL Nortatlas D-ACUT at the Hermeskeil Aviation Museum in Germany.

Another government donation to the museum. This time a Royal Jordanian Air Force DC-3 Dakota troop transport at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

Another government donation to the museum. This time a Royal Jordanian Air Force DC-3 Dakota troop transport at the Hermeskeil aviation museum in Germany.

We'll close with some bathroom humour for avgeeks! This is the biffy aboard the Jordanian Air Force DC-3 (see above), which was very obviously British maintained or operated at some time in her illustrious career.

We’ll close with some bathroom humour for avgeeks! This is the biffy aboard the Jordanian Air Force DC-3 (see above), which was very obviously British maintained or operated at some time in her illustrious career.

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/hermeskeil-aviation-museum-germany-visit-november-2018/feed/ 0
Visit to The Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley BC https://www.henrytenby.com/visit-to-the-canadian-museum-of-flight-in-langley-bc/ https://www.henrytenby.com/visit-to-the-canadian-museum-of-flight-in-langley-bc/#comments Mon, 18 Feb 2019 21:32:51 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5592 Henry Tenby and Andreas Stryk at the Canadian Museum of Flight

Henry Tenby and Andreas Stryk at the Canadian Museum of Flight early February 2019, the snowiest day of the year.

About a one hour drive east along the Trans Canada freeway from Vancouver city centre, at Langley airport resides the Canadian Museum of Flight and their winderful collection of Canadian aviation aircraft and artifacts.

The museum is truly a labour of love for the many dedicated volunteers and fans that keep the museum going. My visit of early February, 2019, so happened to be during the first major snow storm of the year. But that did not stop us from enjoying our visit.

From the main entrance where they have a small selection of gifts and a large selection of donated aviation books for sale, a back door leads to the small courtyard where their nice collection of aircraft are presented for observation and close study, including a CF-101 Starfighter, RCAF Bolingbroke, and a Beech 18 aling with an interesting collection of engines from types that served in Canadian skies.

The indoors part of the collection is lovingly preserved in an adjacent and heated hangar, where Canadian and BC aviation history from the civil airline and military perspectives is presented for leisurely visits by museum visitors. The centre section of the heated hangar is also a quasi aircraft storage and maintenance space for the flying aircraft that are part of the museum’s treasured collection of vintage.

The people and volunteers we met during our visit were super friendly. I can only recommend that all aviations fans visiting the lower mainland take the time and effort to visit and support this wonderful aviation museum. Now you can’t say “I didn’t know there was an aviation museum in the lower mainland of Vancouver.”

Vintage Air Canada 1990s-2000s Flight Attendant uniform at Canadian Museum of Flight

Vintage Air Canada 1990s-2000s Flight Attendant uniform at Canadian Museum of Flight.

CP Air Boeing SST Super Sonic Transport model at Canadian Museum of Flight.

CP Air Boeing SST Super Sonic Transport model at Canadian Museum of Flight.

Air BC Flight Attendant Uniform circa 1990s at the Canadian Museum of Flight.

Air BC Flight Attendant Uniform circa 1990s at the Canadian Museum of Flight. This was the standard Air Canada Connector uniform throughout most of the 1990s.

Air Canada Jazz Flight Attendant Uniform circa 2000s at the Canadian Museum of Flight.

Air Canada Jazz Flight Attendant Uniform circa 2000s at the Canadian Museum of Flight.

Bristol Blenheim cockpit section at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Bristol Blenheim cockpit section at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

A nice inside view of the heated hangar and museum display at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

A nice inside view of the heated hangar and museum display at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Restored Handley Page Hampden at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Restored Handley Page Hampden at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Air Canada mainline Flight Attendant uniform 2000s at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Air Canada mainline Flight Attendant uniform 2000s at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Queen Charlotte Airlines LTD Stranraer flying boat model at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Queen Charlotte Airlines LTD Stranraer flying boat model at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Rare Canadiana! A colour view from the 40s or 50s of a Junkers brush plane, somewhere in the Canadian hinterlands. Not sure of the operator. Image is at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Rare Canadiana! A colour view from the 40s or 50s of a Junkers brush plane, somewhere in the Canadian hinterlands. Not sure of the operator. Image is at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

A restored RCAF De Havilland Vampire at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

A restored RCAF De Havilland Vampire at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

A 'to-the-point" no BS US Military Base restricted area warning sign from the 1950s! At the at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

A ‘to-the-point” no BS US Military Base restricted area warning sign from the 1950s! At the at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Guess the type! It is a Canadian Forces CF-104 Starfighter at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Guess the type! It is a Canadian Forces CF-104 Starfighter at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Always happy at an aviation museum! Henry Tenby doesn't mind a little snow getting in the way of enjoying a visit to at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Always happy at an aviation museum! Henry Tenby doesn’t mind a little snow getting in the way of enjoying a visit to at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Lovely 1/50th scale CP Air Boeing 737-200 travel agent display model by Pacific Miniatures, circa early 1970s. At the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Lovely 1/50th scale CP Air Boeing 737-200 travel agent display model by Pacific Miniatures, circa early 1970s. At the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Canadian Coast Guard Sikorsky S-55 on display at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

Canadian Coast Guard Sikorsky S-55 on display at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

A very nice 1/100 scale Canadian Pacific Airlines Douglas DC-8-8-63 in the goose livery on display at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC. Models dates from 1968 and was likely made by Westway Models of Wembley, Middlesex, UK.

A very nice 1/100 scale Canadian Pacific Airlines Douglas DC-8-8-63 in the goose livery on display at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC. Models dates from 1968 and was likely made by Westway Models of Wembley, Middlesex, UK.

A very nice 1/100 scale Pacific Western Airlines Boeing 767-200 executive desk model on display at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC. Models dates from 1982-83 and was made by Scalecraft Models of New Zealand.

A very nice 1/100 scale Pacific Western Airlines Boeing 767-200 executive desk model on display at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC. Models dates from 1982-83 and was made by Scalecraft Models of New Zealand.

A 1/72 scale desk model of Transair Cargo's Armstrong Whitworth Argosy Freighter at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC. This aircraft was based in Winnipeg in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

A 1/72 scale desk model of Transair Cargo’s Armstrong Whitworth Argosy Freighter at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC. This aircraft was based in Winnipeg in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

An incredibly grotesque model. This being a brutishly ugly attempted representation of a CP Air DC-8-43 circa 1970s. This model was originally made by Peter V. Nelson of the UK in the 1960s and was originally finished in the Canadian Pacific goose colours. The model is part of the artifacts collection at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

An incredibly grotesque model. This being a brutishly ugly attempted representation of a CP Air DC-8-43 circa 1970s. This model was originally made by Peter V. Nelson of the UK in the 1960s and was originally finished in the Canadian Pacific goose colours. The model is part of the artifacts collection at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, BC.

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/visit-to-the-canadian-museum-of-flight-in-langley-bc/feed/ 0
Amsterdam Aviation Fair 2018 Was an Amazing Success! (PHOTO REPORT) https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-fair-2018-was-an-amazing-success-photo-report/ https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-fair-2018-was-an-amazing-success-photo-report/#comments Tue, 13 Mar 2018 16:14:10 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5364
Niels Dam and Henry Tenby give the "thumbs up" to the 2018 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

Niels Dam and Henry Tenby give the “thumbs up” to the 2018 Amsterdam Aviation Fair.

I had the great pleasure of attending the 2018 Amsterdam Aviation Fair at the Van der Valk hotel at Schiphol Airport on February 25, 2018.

It was truly an amazing success! There were over 200 tables and 1000+ plus attendees which makes it the world’s largest airline collectibles show! It certainly rivals or exceeds the size of some of the US national Airliners International Conventions, which were considered the grand-daddy of airline hobby shows.

Everything under the sun for airline fans were at the show. There was a huge selection of aircraft models, both the professional display models and diecasts, and huge amounts of books, printed matter, pins, posters, and massive assortments bric-a-brack airline collectibles.

I can’t wait for next year’s AMS show and wish them all the best in their organizing this awesome event!

We offer a very special thanks to Patrick van Rooijen and his team for staging such an amazing event! For show details please visit http://aviationfair.com

This is show organizer Patrick van Rooijen officiating the door prize raffle.

This is show organizer Patrick van Rooijen (far right) officiating the door prize raffle.

AMS18

AMS7

AMS8

AMS9

AMS10

AMS11

AMS12

AMS13

AMS14

AMS15

AMS16

AMS17

AMS1

AMS2

AMS3

AMS4

AMS5

AMS6

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/amsterdam-aviation-fair-2018-was-an-amazing-success-photo-report/feed/ 0
Taipei Sung Shan Airport circa 1971 (China Airlines Assistance to Uncle Sam During the Vietnam War) https://www.henrytenby.com/taipei-sung-shan-airport-circa-1971-china-airlines-assistance-to-uncle-sam-during-the-vietnam-war/ https://www.henrytenby.com/taipei-sung-shan-airport-circa-1971-china-airlines-assistance-to-uncle-sam-during-the-vietnam-war/#comments Mon, 19 Feb 2018 00:17:35 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5344 During the early 1970s when the Vietnam War was raging in Vietnam, Taipei was a strong US ally and their international airport at Taipei (Sung Shan) was a major depot and transit point for the US military.

As is clearly evident in the colour slides taken in 1971 by the late Rick Wargo, we can see that maintenance was performed on an assortment of US military transport aircraft at this location. Specifically, the China Airlines hangar was either made available to the US military to conduct depot repairs, or repairs were contracted out to the airline. The fact that in some of the photos we can see that the hangar roof signage “China Airlines” has been changed to “INA AIRLINES” suggests that the airline did not want to advertise whatever the arrangement might have been, whatever the case.

Taipei’s Sung Shan airport is very much a city airport in that it is very close to the city centre, and in later years a larger international airport (CKS) was constructed quite some distance from the city. That said, to this very day, Sung Shan remains a very busy and popular airport, largely serving airlines that connect Taipei to other cities on the airline and in the region.

But back in 1971, the international traffic at Taipei Sung Shan airport was rather impressive. The presence of Flying Tigers Douglas DC-8-63s, and Northwest Orient and TWA Boeing 707s, suggests the airport was a popular transit point for long haul services bring US servicemen from the Continental US to serve their tours of duty in the Vietnam War. Many of these very flights might have also had transit stops at Honolulu, which was also a popular Vietnam War charter transit location.

The regional airline scene of the day was also extremely interesting with Korean Airlines Boeing 720, JAL DC-8-61, Philippine Airlines DC-8 (series -30 and -50), Cathay Pacific Convair 880, Thai International DC-8-30, and Hang Khong 727-100 presence at Sung Shan also being noted in the period photos.

The ROC Taiwan domestic airline scene was a lot less developed than today, with local service provided by China Airlines NAMC YS-11, 727-100 and DC-4 aircraft, and Far Easter Air Transport Dart Heralds. It seems the photo vantage points at Sung Shan airport in 1972 consisted of an elevated apron view from the airport terminal building, as well as several outside photo spots by the runway and taxiway. It is believed that excellent photo spots remain near the airport ring road under the final approach, as the close confines of the city’s developments require aircraft to make very low approaches over the road.

Of course we must be very grateful that the late Rick Wargo took these very interesting photos, and we extend very special thanks to Rick’s wife Karen for making these images available so they could be shared and enjoyed.

China Air Lines DC-4 at company hangar at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971.

China Air Lines DC-4 at company hangar at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971. Notice the “China Airlines” name on the hangar roof. This was changed soon after this image was taken, as explained below.

Awesome view of FEAT Far Eastern Air Transport Dart Herald B-2011 at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Notice all the USAF military transports parked at the "INA AIRLINES" hangar. A fictitious name most likely, as these aircraft were receiving maintenance here in support of the Vietnam War efforts.

Awesome view of FEAT Far Eastern Air Transport Dart Herald B-2011 at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Notice all the USAF military transports parked at the “INA AIRLINES” hangar. A fictitious name most likely, as these aircraft were receiving maintenance here in support of the Vietnam War efforts. And China Airlines preferred not to advertise the fact.

Philippine Airlines DC-8-30 PI-C829 operating a sked service from Manila at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Philippine Airlines DC-8-30 PI-C829 operating a sked service from Manila at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

US Navy C-47 South East Asian based aircraft at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Notice the Chinese characters on the forward fuselage.

US Navy C-47 South East Asian based aircraft at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Notice the Chinese characters on the forward fuselage.

USAF Lockheed C140 Jetstar O-35960 at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Probably on a maintenance visit or some other Vietnam War related VIP charter. Note the Vietnam War camouflage scheme. This aircraft was used to test navigational aids.

USAF Lockheed C140 Jetstar O-35960 at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Probably on a maintenance visit or some other Vietnam War related VIP charter. Note the Vietnam War camouflage scheme. This aircraft was used to test navigational aids.

China Airlines Boeing 727-100 at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Probably taken soon after her initial delivery from Boeing.

China Airlines Boeing 727-100 at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Probably taken soon after her initial delivery from Boeing.

Hang Khong Viet Nam Airlines Boeing 727-100 at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Most probably operating a sked service from South Vietnam.

Hang Khong Viet Nam Airlines Boeing 727-100 at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Most probably operating a sked service from South Vietnam.

Northwest Orient Boeing 707-351 N367US on a Vietnam War troop charter at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Northwest Orient Boeing 707-351 N367US on a Vietnam War troop charter at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Malaysia Singapore Airlines Boeing 707 at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971.

Malaysia Singapore Airlines Boeing 707 at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971.

Nice nose on shot of a Thai DC-8-40 at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971.

Nice nose on shot of a Thai DC-8-40 at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971.

Korean AIr Lines Boeing 720 HL7403 at Taipie Sung Shan Airport November 1971

Korean AIr Lines Boeing 720 HL7403 at Taipie Sung Shan Airport November 1971.

China Airlines DC-4 about to touch down at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

China Airlines DC-4 about to touch down at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Northwest Orient Boeing 707-351 N366US on a Vietnam War troop charter at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Northwest Orient Boeing 707-351 N366US on a Vietnam War troop charter at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

TWA Boeing 707 turning onto the active at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971. Probably Vietnam troop charter.

TWA Boeing 707 turning onto the active at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971. Probably Vietnam troop charter.

Southern Air Transport Lockheed Hercules at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971.

Southern Air Transport Lockheed Hercules at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971. Most certainly a Vietnam War related supply charter.

Philippine Airlines DC-8-50 PC-C803 operating a sked service at Taipei Sung Shan airport November, 1971.

Philippine Airlines DC-8-50 PC-C803 operating a sked service at Taipei Sung Shan airport November, 1971.

Japan Air Lines DC-8-61 JA8041 scheduled service at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971.

Japan Air Lines DC-8-61 JA8041 scheduled service at Taipei Sung Shan airport 1971.

China Airlines NAMC YS-11 B-158 landing at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

China Airlines NAMC YS-11 B-158 landing at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. This type was very short lived with China Airlines and photos are quite rare.

Thai International DC-8-30 HS-TGO operating a sked service Flying Tigers DC-8-63 N782FT operating a Vietnam War charter at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Thai International DC-8-30 HS-TGO operating a sked service Flying Tigers DC-8-63 N782FT operating a Vietnam War charter at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Flying Tigers DC-8-63 N782FT operating a Vietnam War charter at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Flying Tigers DC-8-63 N782FT operating a Vietnam War charter at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Fabulous view of Cathay Pacific Convair 880 VR-HFY at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Fabulous view of Cathay Pacific Convair 880 VR-HFY at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971 on her way to the active for the return sked flight back to home base of Hong Kong Kai Tak.

Flying Tigers DC-8-63 mid apron at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971.

Flying Tigers DC-8-63 mid apron at Taipei Sung Shan airport circa 1971. Most likely operating a Vietnam War charter.

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/taipei-sung-shan-airport-circa-1971-china-airlines-assistance-to-uncle-sam-during-the-vietnam-war/feed/ 0
Five engined Boeing 747 BOAC Classic at Zurich Klotten in May 1972 https://www.henrytenby.com/five-engined-boeing-747-boac-classic-at-zurich-kloten-in-may-1972/ https://www.henrytenby.com/five-engined-boeing-747-boac-classic-at-zurich-kloten-in-may-1972/#comments Wed, 07 Feb 2018 17:23:37 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5317 Back in the 1960s and 1970s aircraft manufacturers devised special engine pods so that passenger jetliners could easily transport a spare engine between locations, often during the course of a schedule flight.

The first generation jetliners including the Boeing 707 and Douglas DC-8 were factory engineered for this special engine carrying capability. Special hard points were established on the underside of the wing between the fuselage and the inboard port side engine, and aerodynamically shaped engine transport pods could be easily and quickly anchored to the hard points.

Even the DC-10 and Boeing 747 (series 100 and 200) were engineered with this special feature. Photos of a four engined DC-10 are extremely rare, and fine engine 747s are not a lot easier to find.

In May of 1972, BOAC attached a fifth engine onto one of their then new 747-136 aircraft which positioned into Zurich’s Kloten Airport with the spare engine, which was possibly bound for locally based Swissair, which had just taken delivery of two brand new 747-257Bs of their own.

The photos below were taken of that special visit by a Swissair employee who kindly gave me a small number of slides he took back in the day. (He wishes to remain anonymous.)

BOAC Boeing 747-136 5 engine ferry into ZRH MAY 1972

BOAC Boeing 747-136 5 engine ferry into ZRH MAY 1972

BOAC Boeing 747-136 5 engine ferry into ZRH MAY 1972

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/five-engined-boeing-747-boac-classic-at-zurich-kloten-in-may-1972/feed/ 0
Hickam AFB Honolulu in 1940s and 1950s Vintage Color Slides Discovered https://www.henrytenby.com/hickam-afb-honolulu-in-1940s-and-1950s-vintage-color-slides-discovered/ https://www.henrytenby.com/hickam-afb-honolulu-in-1940s-and-1950s-vintage-color-slides-discovered/#comments Sun, 28 Jan 2018 06:24:34 +0000 https://www.henrytenby.com/?p=5277
This is the arrival terminal building at Hickam Air Force base as seen in the 1940s and early 1950s.

This is the arrival terminal building at Hickam Air Force Base as seen in the 1940s and early 1950s.

Hickam Air Force Base in Honolulu rose to prominence in public awareness after the Japanese attacked the US military installations at Pearl Harbour and the nearby airfields on Oahu, in the Hawaiian Islands. The attacked occurred on December 7, 1941, a “date which will live in infamy” as famously proclaimed by US President Roosevelt, and from that day to current times, Hawaii (and Guam to a much lesser extent) remains as the western most homeland base of deference against attack from unfriendly forces that may originate in the Pacific. Which unfortunately, even today is a worry in the ever changing dynamics on the Korean peninsula.

After the end of World War II, large inventories of aircraft that were built for the war effort were kept on hand based at Hickam Air Force Base, near Honolulu in the Hawaiian Islands, as American would never again let her guard down in this all important theatre. Although the US forces remained in Japan after the end of the war, to oversee the democratic rebuilding of that country, military supplies and personnel that were transported by air from the continental United States, would use Hawaii as a rest point during the long, trans-Pacific air journey. Of course, propeller driven aircraft of 1940s and 1950s simply did not have the trans-Pacific non-stop ranges that we take for granted today, that are matter-of-fact with current jet airliners.

As a collector of 35mm colour aircraft slides going back to the early 1980s, I recently acquired some vintage colour 35mm kodachrome original slides taken during the 1940s and 1950s that were taken at Hickam Air Force Base. The images and colours have retained their brilliance and have been preserved quite remarkably against fading, despite their age. This is evidenced from the scans of the images, as presented below. Sadly, I do not know who took the slides as there is no photographer name indicated on the slide mounts. That said, many thousands of US servicemen and related family members and support personnel transited the Hawaiian Islands during this fascinating post war era. It was not only Japan and other US allies such as the Philippines and Korea that were within the US sphere of influence, but it was also at this time that the US military was engaged in nuclear weapon testing (above ground atmospheric detonations) in the South Pacific. And much of the logistical support for these tests was staged via the Hawaiian Islands.

Aircraft that were prevalent at Hickam during this interesting time frame consisted of prop driven transport planes such as USAF MATS (Military Air Transport Service) Douglas C-54 Skymasters, Boeing C-97 Stratocruisers, Douglas C-47 Dakotas, Curtiss C-46 Commandos, and Fairchild C-82 Packets and C-119 Flying Boxcars, many of which were locally based at Hickam, whilst others were transient visitors. And of course there were fighter attack aircraft also based at Hickam, which is evidenced by these historic views of the Hickam apron loaded with rows of both Republic P-47D Thunderbolts and Curtiss SB2 Helldivers.

US Air Force C-119 Flying Boxcar is serviced on the ramp at Hickam Air Force Base in Holoulu, Hawaii, circa early 1950s.

US Air Force Fairchild C-82 Packet 557736 is serviced on the ramp at Hickam Air Force Base in Honolulu, Hawaii, circa early 1950s.

A view to the active dispersal apron, loaded with USAF P-47D Thunderbolts, also referred to as "jugs" because of their jug-shaped fuselages.

A view to the active dispersal apron, loaded with USAF Republic P-47D Thunderbolts, also referred to as “jugs” because of their jug-shaped fuselages.

This young fellow was a keen aircraft photographer back in the early 1950s or late 1940s. He seems to be holding a fairly nice camera for the day. It is shame we do not know his name, as he might very well be the fellow who took all the images presented on this page. We are grateful to him for his efforts so that we may enjoy these images of how things were, some seventy years ago.

This young fellow was a keen aircraft photographer back in the early 1950s or late 1940s. He seems to be holding a fairly nice camera for the day. It is shame we do not know his name, as he might very well be the fellow who took all the images presented in this report. We are grateful for his efforts so that we may enjoy these images of how things were, some seventy years ago.

A USAF MATS C-54 at rest on the Hickam apron, as viewed through the forward crew door on a sister C-54. Circa early 1950s.

A USAF MATS Douglas C-54 Skymaster at rest on the Hickam apron, as viewed through the forward crew door on a sister Douglas C-54. Circa early 1950s.

USAF P-47D Thunderbolt and a North American T-6 Texan, both looking very new with factory polished metal fuselage and wing surfaces. This images taken at Hickam probably dates from just after the end of World War II.

USAF Republic P-47D Thunderbolt and a North American T-6 Texan, both looking very new with factory polished metal fuselage and wing surfaces. This image taken at Hickam Air Force Base probably dates from just after the end of World War II.

A very busy and well protected Hickam apron, circa mid to late 1940s. We have rows of Curtiss Sb2 Helldivers, as well as Corsair IIs.

A very busy and well protected Hickam apron, circa mid to late 1940s. We have rows of Curtiss SB2 Helldivers, as well as rows of Vought F4U Corsairs (left side).

Hickam Air Force Base transient apron circa early 1950s. We have a Pacific based USAF MATS C-97 Stratocruiser, with a serviceman and his wife or girlfriend are seen in lower centre frame. The flower lei on the woman is a Hawaiian tradition that dates back generations.

Hickam Air Force Base transient apron circa early 1950s. We have a Pacific based USAF MATS C-97 Stratocruiser, with a serviceman and his wife or girlfriend seen in lower centre frame. The flower lei on the woman is a Hawaiian tradition that dates back generations.

Hickam Air Force Base transient ramp Gate Number 1, with a MATS C-121 Connie and a C-54 resting between flights.  This images most likely dates from the early 1950s.

Hickam Air Force Base transient ramp Gate Number 1, with a USAF Pacific Division Lockheed C-121 Constellation and a USAF MATS Douglas C-54 Skymaster resting between flights. This images most likely dates from the early 1950s.

Very historic image of USAF P-47D Thunderbolts lined up on the Hickam AFB apron taken during post World War II in the late 1940s. Glorious kodachrome.

Very historic image of USAF Republic P-47D Thunderbolts lined up on the Hickam AFB apron, taken during post World War II era of the late 1940s. Glorious kodachrome.

Another fine view of the Hickam AFB transient apron, which is teaming with Douglas C-54 Skymasters. Hundreds of these were built for the war effort, and after the war, the US military had a huge inventory, which were luckily still on strength and were able to support the supply efforts of the Berlin Airlift. It is possible this image taken at Hickam was taken before the Berlin Airlift, just based on the large number of locally stationed aircraft.

Another fine view of the Hickam AFB transient apron, which is teaming with Douglas C-54 Skymasters. Hundreds of these were built for the war effort, and after the war, the US military had a huge inventory, which were luckily still on strength and available to support the supply efforts of the Berlin Airlift. It is very possible this image taken of the Hickam apron dates prior to the Berlin Airlift, just based on the large number of locally stationed aircraft. During the Berlin Airlift, many of these aircraft were re-assigned to Europe.

A World War II surplus Boeing B-17 and an army olive four-bladed C-46 Commando at rest on the Hickam apron, late 1940s.

A World War II surplus Boeing B-17 and an army olive scheme four-bladed Curtiss C-46 Commando at rest on the Hickam apron, late 1940s.

Hickam was naturally a major repair facility for the US Air Force, as seen by these maintenance sheds, which remained at Honolulu well into the 1980s. This early 1950s image shows  49033 USAF MATS C-45 Skymaster. The "Hickam" title on the tail denotes that this aircraft was locally based.

Hickam was naturally a major repair facility for the US Air Force, as seen by these open-air maintenance sheds, which remained at Honolulu as prominent fixtures well into the 1980s. This early 1950s image shows USAF MATS Douglas C-45 Skymaster 49033. The “Hickam” title on the tail denotes that this aircraft was locally based.

Looking good! A USAF MATS C-97 Boeing Startocruiser 0694 having just arrived either from the West Coast or the Far East. Here passenger door is open and she rests at Hickam's "Gate No 1" in this period early 1950s kodachrome view.

Looking good!USAF MATS Boeing C-97 Stratocruiser 0694 has just arrived either from the West Coast or the Far East. Her passenger door is open and she rests at Hickam’s “Gate No 1″ in this period early 1950s kodachrome view.

]]>
https://www.henrytenby.com/hickam-afb-honolulu-in-1940s-and-1950s-vintage-color-slides-discovered/feed/ 0